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Introduction

6 Appointments


There are currently seven different technical certification categories of HV certifier. The NZTA assesses and qualifies four and the other three are assessed by external organisations, with final approval the responsibility of the NZTA.

The categories that the NZTA assess are:

  • chassis modification
  • towing connections

Dynamic performance analysis

  • load anchorages, and
  • swept path analysis.

Those assessed by external organisations are:

  • log bolster attachments
  • brake modifications
  • static rollover threshold.
Manufacturer IO & VI

All persons appointed as HV certifiers are required to be and to remain ‘fit and proper persons’. The criteria considered for this include:

a) relevant criminal convictions

b) transport-related offences

c) relevant warnings, penalties and disciplinary actions imposed

d) relevant complaints

e) the interest of the public and land transport safety.

Engineer certifier requirements

All HV certifiers must:

a) have a minimum qualification of NZCE (mechanical, civil or aviation) or approved equivalent, except where specialist knowledge and experience is deemed acceptable by the NZTA. Overseas qualifications must be referred to the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA), who will determine the New Zealand equivalent, if available.

b) have knowledge of the requirements specified in:

i. this manual, VIRM: Heavy vehicle specialist certification

ii. the relevant parts of the Land Transport Act 1998

iii. the Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Standards Compliance 2002

iv. Other relevant Land Transport Rules.

Applicants for appointment as HV certifiers will be assessed on their understanding of design principles for their category and their knowledge of the general and New Zealand requirements for heavy vehicles.

Load anchorage certifiers (HVEA)
Scope

All anchorages for securing loads to vehicles, excluding logging bolsters. Certifiers shall use the latest version of any standard except where permitted otherwise in the Rule.

Experience requirements

Relevant work experience in the design or fabrication of load anchorages. Working knowledge of the following documents:

1. Land Transport Rule: Heavy Vehicles 2004 and its amendments

2. Welding in the transport industry (see Technical bulletin 13)

3. NZS 5444: Load Anchorage Points for Heavy Vehicles

4. NZS 5413: Stock Crates

5. AS/NZS 1554: Structural Steel Welding (parts 1 and 4 as appropriate)

6 AS/NZS 1665: Welding of Aluminium structures

7. AS 3990: Mechanical Equipment – Steelwork (supersedes AS 1250)

8. ISO 1161: Series 1 Freight Containers – Corner Fittings – Specification

9. BS 5400: Part 10, Code of Practice for Fatigue

10. BS 7608: Code of Practice for Fatigue Design and Assessment of Steel Structures

11. AS/NZS 2980: Qualification Tests for Metal Arc Welders

12. AS/NZS 4380:Cargo restraint systems – Webbing load restraint systems.

Towing connections certifier (HVET)
Scope

All towing connections between vehicles. This includes fifth wheels, fifth-wheel kingpins, towbars, drawbeams and drawbars.

Experience requirements

Relevant work experience in the design or fabrication of towing connections. Working knowledge of the following documents:

1. Land Transport Rule: Heavy Vehicles 2004 and its amendments

2. Welding in the transport industry (see Technical bulletin 13)

3. NZS 5446:Code of Practice for Heavy Motor Vehicle Towing Connections: Drawbar Trailers

4. NZS 5450:Specification for Coupling Devices for Articulated Vehicles – Fifth Wheel Assemblies

5. NZS 5451:Specification for Coupling Devices for Articulated Vehicles – Fifth Wheel Kingpins

6. AS/NZS 4968, Heavy-vehicles – Mechanical coupling between articulated vehicle combinations

7. AS 2174, Articulated vehicles – Mechanical coupling between prime movers and semitrailers

8. AS 3990: 1993, Mechanical Equipment – Steelwork

9. AS/NZS 1554: Structural Steel Welding (parts 1 and 4 as appropriate)

10 AS/NZS 1665: Welding of Aluminium structures

11. AS/NZS 2980: Qualification Tests for Metal Arc Welders

12. NZS 5467: Code of Practice for Light Trailers

13. ISO 1102: Commercial Road Vehicles – Mechanical Connections between Towing Vehicles and Trailers–50mm Drawbar Couplings

14. AS 1110: ISO Metric Hexagon Precision Bolts and Screws

15. AS/NZS 4291.1: Mechanical properties of fasteners

16. AS 2213: 50mm Pin-Type Couplings and Drawbar Eyes for Trailers

17. BS 5400: Part 10, Code of Practice for Fatigue

18. BS 7608: Code of Practice for Fatigue Design and Assessment of Steel Structures.

Chassis modification and repair certifier (HVEC)
Scope

Chassis modification includes rollover strength for PSVs, steering conversions, chassis modifications and repairs, design of new chassis and ratings, mounting of cranes and other equipment, modifications and repairs to drive trains and axles, and seatbelt anchorage design.

Experience requirements

Relevant work experience in the design, modification and fabrication of vehicles and vehicle components. Working knowledge of the following documents:

1. Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Standards Compliance 2002 and its amendments

2. Land Transport Rule: Heavy Vehicles 2004 and its amendments

3. Welding in the transport industry (see Technical bulletin 13)

4. AS/NZS 1554: Structural Steel Welding (parts 1 and 4 as appropriate)

5. AS/NZS 1665: Welding of Aluminium structures

6. AS/NZS 2980: Qualification Tests for Metal Arc Welders

7. AS 3990: 1993, Mechanical Equipment – Steelwork

8. Ladder frame chassis design guide (joint MoT/IRL document)

9. BS 5400: 1980, Part 10, Code of Practice for Fatigue

10. BS 7608: 1993 Code of Practice for Fatigue, Design and Assessment of Steel Structures

11. AS 1110: ISO Metric Hexagon Precision Bolts and Screws

12. AS/NZS 4291.1: Mechanical properties of fasteners

13. Low Volume Vehicle Code.

Brake certifier (HVEK)
Scope

All heavy vehicle brake system design and modification

Experience requirements

Relevant work experience in the design and modification of braking systems. Passed Heavy Vehicle Brake course and exam as approved by the NZTA. Working knowledge of the following documents:

1. Land Transport Rule: Heavy Vehicles Brakes 2006 and its amendments, including Schedule 5

2. Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Standards Compliance 2002 and its amendments

3. Access to the New Zealand brake calculator or an approved proprietary device.

Bolster attachment certifier (HVEL)
Scope

All logging bolster attachments, modifications and repairs.

Experience requirements

The certifier must:

1. be an appointed HVEC certifier with sufficient (three years or more) experience in the transport industry in manufacturing, supervision, quality control or drafting in a similar area:

2. have passed the log bolster attachment course and exam set by the Log Transport Safety Council

3. have a working knowledge of Land Transport Rule: Heavy Vehicles 2004 and its amendments

4. have a working knowledge of Log Transport Safety Council: Log Bolster Attachment Code.

5. have a working knowledge of Welding in the transport industry (see Technical bulletin 13)

6. have a working knowledge of AS/NZS 1554: Structural Steel Welding (parts 1 and 4 as appropriate)

7. have a working knowledge of AS/NZS 1665: Welding of Aluminium structures

8. have a working knowledge of AS/NZS 2980: Qualification Tests for Metal Arc Welders

9. have a working knowledge of AS 3990: 1993, Mechanical Equipment – Steelwork

10. have a working knowledge of BS 5400: 1980, Part 10, Code of Practice for Fatigue

11. have a working knowledge of BS 7608: 1993 Code of Practice for Fatigue, Design and Assessment of Steel Structures

12. have a working knowledge of AS 1110: ISO Metric Hexagon Precision Bolts and Screws

13. have a working knowledge of AS/NZS 4291.1: Mechanical properties of fasteners

Static rollover threshold certifier (HVSx)
Scope

Measure and input vehicle data into a computer program to establish a stability angle. There are currently three different certification categories for SRT calculation

  • SRT level 1
  • SRT level 2
  • SRT level 3.
Experience requirements

For those wishing to qualify as NZTA approved and appointed inspectors there are two tests:

  • basic for level 1 inspectors and
  • advanced for level 2 inspectors.

Level 1 certifiers use the SRT calculator software but are limited to simpler cases. For certification purposes a level 1 certifier may use all the features of the calculator except Load category ‘Other’, which requires the calculation of the payload centre of gravity and the ‘user defined’ suspension options, which requires the obtaining and interpretation of suspension parameters.

Level 2 certifiers also use the SRT calculator software but have all options available.

Level 3 certifiers may be approved by the NZTA to use alternative methods of determining SRT. These could include tilt table testing or computer simulation.

Within the framework of the two levels of certification, there are four parties that may be involved in gathering the data for SRT certification, namely:

1. Operator: may provide tare axle weight data and may nominate load type (Uniform density/ Mixed freight/ Other) on which the certification is to be based except where this is defined by the NZTA.

2. Level 1 SRT inspectors: typically these are individuals who have passed the level 1 SRT training but have not been authorised by the NZTA to be certifiers.

3. HVS1 certifiers: typically these are individuals who have passed the level 1 SRT training and have been appointed by the NZTA to act as certifiers under the NZTA’s Notice of Appointment.

4. HVS2 certifiers: typically individuals who have passed both the level 1 and level 2 SRT training and have been appointed by the NZTA to act as certifiers.

Information and measured vehicle data may be shared between the last three parties as indicated in the diagram below. In this diagram S1 refers to Level 1 SRT inspectors, while HVS1 and HVS2 refers to the certifiers. The arrows indicate allowable paths of information and data transfer. Thus a Level 1 certifier, HVS1, may receive vehicle data that has been obtained by a Level 1 SRT inspector and use these data to undertake a level 1 certification without personally inspecting the vehicle and making the measurements. However, the HVS1 certifier is ultimately responsible for the accuracy of the SRT certificate issued and must ensure that the S1 inspector is appropriately qualified and competent.

Although the allowable data transfers do permit the transfer of information from HVS1 certifiers to HVS2 certifiers, this can only be within the scope of the HVS1’s demonstrated level of competence. Thus a level 2 certification which requires an HVS2 certifier will also require that the vehicle is inspected by an HVS2 certifier.

When the certifier issues an SRT certificate he must also issue an LT400 to accompany it.

For some vehicles, the SRT certification process will lead to some vehicle or suspension modifications being undertaken in order to improve the vehicle’s stability and allow it to maintain its load carrying capacity while achieving the required SRT. These vehicle modifications will generally require certification by an NZTA- approved certifying engineer and will require the issuing of an LT400 detailing the modifications made. Although the certification of the vehicle modifications and the SRT certification may be undertaken by the same engineer certifier, if he is appropriately qualified, two separate LT400s are required, one for the vehicle modifications and one for the SRT.

5

Dynamic Performance certifier (HVPx)
Scope

To confirm swept path and dynamic vehicle performance by calculation using approved software or by physical testing. There are two different certification categories for Swept Path/Dynamic Performance

  • HVP1 – Swept Path Certification
  • HVP2 – Dynamic Vehicle Performance (PBS)
Experience requirements

For those wishing to qualify as NZTA approved and appointed inspectors in either of these categories there are some prerequisites. The certifier must:

1. be an appointed HVEC certifier with sufficient (one year for HVP1 or three years or more for HVP2) experience in the transport industry in manufacturing, supervision, quality control or drafting in a similar area:

2. for HVP1 & 2 have access to and be able to prove competence operating appropriate computer software (such software to be advised to the NZTA who will rule on its suitability) and/or the ability to carry out appropriate physical testing.

3. have attended and passed any course and/or exam set or approved by the NZTA

4. have a working knowledge of Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Dimensions and Mass 2002 and its amendments

5. have a working knowledge of Land Transport Rule: Heavy vehicles 2004 and its amendments

HVP1 certifiers use appropriate software or physical testing to provide Swept Path Certificates to either or both of Schedule 8 or Schedule 9 of Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Dimensions and Mass 2002.

HVP2 certifiers also use the appropriate software and/or physical testing to provide dynamic vehicle performance analysis for proposed high productivity vehicles, either new pro-forma or bespoke designs within the limits set by the Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Dimensions and Mass 2002 and its amendments.

Local manufacturer (HVxD)
Scope

As different from the HV Engineering certifier, the local manufacturer certifier responsibility is split between an inspecting organisation (IO) and a vehicle inspector (VI). Each of these roles is vital and interdependent. A local manufacturing certifier IO cannot certify a heavy vehicle while a local manufacturing certifier VI can only certify a heavy vehicle within the requirements of the VIRM and Memos if s/he is in the employ of a manufacturing certifier IO and the NZTA has a record of this employment.

All work certified by the manufacturing certifier VI at the approved Manufacturing certifier IO premises is to be certified with either:

  • a Statement of Design Compliance (SoDC), issued by an engineer certifier, or
  • for load anchorages, to the designs in NZS 5444, or
  • for worn or damaged fifth wheels, replaced to the fifth wheel manufacturer’s instructions for replacing bolt on components, or
  • for worn or damaged kingpins, replaced according to the kingpin manufacturer’s instructions on replacement, or
  • to NZTA approved pre Engineered solutions.

There are currently five different local manufacturing certification categories:

  • chassis modification (HMCD)
  • towing connections (HMTD)
  • load anchorages (HMAD)
  • log bolster attachments (HMLD)
  • heavy vehicle brakes (HMKD)

Requirements (IO)

The authorised IO is the company or entity responsible for the structural work carried out on a heavy vehicle (not the CEO) and the application must be signed by an appointed office holder of the company who can sign on behalf of the company (Director etc) accompanied by the company seal in the case of a registered company. Each location that is involved with manufacturing certification operations must have an individual appointment. The IO is responsible for ensuring that:

  • the IO takes responsibility for the certification activities carried out by any VI in their employ
  • the premises are well lit and meet the requirements of the certification categories being carried out
  • the IO controls and maintains all necessary equipment for the certification categories carried out
  • The IO controls and maintains a library of all processes and procedures required for all the certification categories carried out, including welding procedures, relevant standards and pre-Engineered Solutions.
  • One or more qualified welding supervisors are appointed to oversee welding operations
  • They have staff with a sound working knowledge of standards, codes of practice and general documents as well as their trade related published material. This includes:
  • Ensure a PDS is completed for each certification activity carried out

Requirements (VI)
Each appointed VI may inspect and certify the work of other operators in the employ of the same IO and must:

  • Take full responsibility for all certifications which they sign off
  • Must only certify work in categories they are authorised for
  • Ensure that they only carry out certification activities when there is sufficient properly controlled and maintained equipment for the certification category carried out
  • Ensure that they only carry out certification activities when there is a sufficient library of all processes and procedures required for the certification being carried out, including welding procedures, relevant standards and pre-Engineered Solutions or SoDCs.
  • Ensure that, where necessary, a properly qualified and appointed welding supervisors has approved the welding on any activity being certified
  • Ensure that they and the staff whose work they are certifying have a sound working knowledge of standards, codes of practice and general documents as wells their trade related published material. This includes:
  • Maintain a PDS for each certification carried out.