Correct as at 8th August 2020. It may be superseded at any time.

Extract taken from: NZTA Vehicle Portal > VIRMs > In-service certification (WoF and CoF) > Technical bulletins (CoF)

Technical bulletins (CoF)

1 Expiry dates recorded on ID label/plate and HVS certificate (LT400)

Application

This technical bulletin applies to components with heavy vehicle specialist certification (LT400).

Clarification

Some heavy vehicle specialist certifiers (HVS certifiers) have been stipulating an expiry date on an identification label/plate and heavy vehicle specialist certificate (LT400) for items other than the ones where the relevant standard or code specifically allows or requires an expiry date.

In other cases, some CoF inspectors have been entering an expiry date on LANDATA, most frequently 10 years after the date of the LT400, even if the certificate does not contain such data.

Both of these situations cause avoidable difficulties to the operators, which is made even more obvious if a relevant standard (eg NZ5444) has changed.

Inspection

1.  CoF inspectors are not to enter any expiry date on LANDATA unless the LT400 was issued for:

a)  a drawbar or drawbeam, first certified to NZS5446 after 1 August 1991, or

b)  a towbar rated over 2000kg MTM, first certified to NZS5446 after 1 August 1991, or

c) a bolster attachment as per the Bolster Attachment Code.

2.  Where an expiry date has been entered on an identification label/plate, LT400 or LANDATA for the specialist certification of items other than those identified under 1. above, CoF inspectors must disregard it. In such cases, a lapsed expiry date is not a reason for rejection.

Page amended 1 July 2014 (see amendment details).

2 OEM wheel rim options

Vehicle inspection requirements manual reference
Safety concern

The fitting of non-approved wheel rims can cause component overloading.

Inspection

The fitting of different wheels to OEM requires heavy vehicle specialist certification unless they are approved by the vehicle manufacturer.

The following vehicle makes and models distributed by the Motor Industry Association of New Zealand and sold through its franchise dealer network have been confirmed as having optional OEM wheel rims.

Vehicles fitted with wheel rims meeting the specified requirements do no not require heavy vehicle specialist certification.

Motor Truck Distributors (NZ) Ltd advises that the heavy motor vehicle marques listed below that have 22.5 inch, disc wheel rims have the following OEM rim width options for single tired axles:

Make

Rim type

Rim brand name

Rim diameter

Rim width

Mack Truck

Steel

Mack

22.5”

8.25”

9.00”

11.75”

12.25” (Mack Truck only)

Alloy

Alcoa

Renault Truck

Steel

Renault

Alloy

Truck Speedline

Volvo Bus and Volvo Truck

Steel

Volvo

Alloy

Alcoa

The fitting of the above wheel rims does not alter the manufacture’s original axle rating.

CablePrice (NZ) Ltd advises that the heavy motor vehicle makes listed below that have disc wheel rims have the following OEM approved rim options:

Make Rim type Rim brand name Rim diameter Rim width
Scania Truck & Scania Bus Steel Scania 22.5" 7.50"
8.25"
9.00"
11.75"
Alloy Alcoa 22.5" 8.25"
9.00"
11.75"
Scania 4x4 & 6x6 models Steel Scania 22.5" 7.50"
8.25"
9.00"
11.75"
TRS Tyre & Wheel Ltd 22.5" 14.00"
20" 11.00"
13.00"
Alloy Alcoa 22.5" 8.25"
9.00"
11.75"

The fitting of the above wheel rims does not alter the manufacturer's original axle ratings.

Hino Distributors (NZ) Ltd. advises that the heavy motor vehicle makes listed below that have disc wheel rims have the following OEM approved rim options:

Make

Rim Type

Rim Brand Name

Rim Diameter

Rim Width

FS1K, FS1E, SS1E, SH1E

GH8J, FM8J

GH1A, FM1A

Steel

Toppy

22.5”

11.75”

Steel

Jansta

22.5”

11.75”

Alloy

Alcoa

22.5”

11.75”

The fitting of the above wheel rims does not alter the manufacturer's original axle ratings.

Penske Commercial Vehicles NZ advises that the heavy motor vehicle makes listed below that have 22.5 inch, disc wheel rims have the following OEM rim options for single tyred axles:

Make Rim type Rim brand name Rim diameter Rim width
MAN Truck and Bus Steel MAN 22.5" 7.50"
8.25"
Alloy Alcoa 9.00"
11.75"

The fitting of the above wheel rims does not alter the manufacturer's original axle ratings.

Mercedes-Benz NZ advises that the heavy motor vehicle makes listed below have the following OEM-approved wheels:

Make

Rim Type

Rim brand name

Rim diameter

Rim width

Mercedes-Benz (MB)

Alloy

Alcoa

19'5

6.75"

Steel

MB

20"

11"

Steel

MB

22.5"

8.25"

9.00"

11.75"

Alloy

Alcoa

8.25"

9.00"

11.75"

The fitting of the above wheel rims does not alter the manufacturer's original axle ratings.

Southpac Trucks Ltd advises that the heavy motor vehicle makes listed below that have disc wheel rims have the following OEM approved rim options:

Make

Rim Type

Rim Brand Name

Rim Diameter

Rim Width

DAF

Steel

DAF

22.5"

8.25"

Alloy

Alcoa

11.5"

 AlloyAlcoa11.75"

Kenworth

Steel

KW

22.5"

8.25"

Steel

KW

9.00"

Alloy

Alcoa

8.25"

Alloy

Alcoa

9.00"

Alloy

Alcoa

12.25"

The fitting of the above wheel rims does not alter the manufacturer's original axle ratings.

Page amended 11 November 2013 (see amendment details)

Page updated 7 August 2020 (see details)

3 Rear seatbelts as aisle obstructions in passenger service vehicles

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: In-service certification (WoF and CoF):

Application

This document applies to people-mover vehicles, such as Toyota Previas, that are used as passenger service vehicles (PSVs) and have factory-fitted seats and seatbelts that comply with approved seat and seatbelt standards.

Safety concern

Practical tests have been carried out by the Low Volume Vehicle Technical Association (LVVTA) to investigate the concern that rear seatbelts fitted to Toyota Previa vehicles may obstruct passengers in the rear row of seats from exiting the vehicle in an emergency. Results show that seatbelts fitted in these types of vehicle may cause a minor nuisance but not an obstruction; passengers in the rear row of seats can still exit in a reasonable manner in emergency situations.

Inspection

Factory-fitted seatbelts in people-mover vehicles operated as PSVs should not be considered as obstructions to the aisle provided:

a) seats and seatbelts are original equipment fitted by the manufacturer, and

b) the seatbelt that crosses the aisle is of a retractable type, and

c) the seats, seatbelts and their installation are unmodified (other than minor trimming of the seatback width to achieve the required aisle width), and standards compliant if applicable.

This concession does not apply to:

  • fold-down seats encroaching on aisle space
  • vehicles that are retrofitted with additional and/or modified seat and seatbelt arrangements. Disconnecting or disabling seat rotation mechanisms is not considered to be a modification.

These vehicles must comply with all PSV requirements, such as aisle width.

4 Taximeter compliance

Meters are not required in small passenger service vehicles. However, if you do use a meter you must ensure that it is accurate.

From 1 October 2017 meters are not a CoF inspection item and meter certification is not carried out by persons authorised by the Transport Agency.

Page amended 1 October 2017 (see amendment details).

5 Door test procedure: Compressed air- or vacuum-operated doors

Legal requirements

The tests are based on the following requirements (see Schedule for details):

Equipment required
  • Test bar (Figure 5-1-1)
  • Scale with a midrange of approximately 12kg.
Test overview

There are two test types to be carried out, as follows:

1. Testing that the door opens automatically when there is an obstruction:

Test 1: Using the non-tapered end of the test bar

2. Testing that, if the door does not open, the test bar can be easily removed, using the following test:

Test 2: Using a scale, pull to ascertain the force required to extract test bar.

Perform test(s) as outlined in the flowchart below.

5

 

Schedule

From Land Transport Rule: Passenger Service Vehicles 1999: sections 2.2 and 2.2(2A)

2.2(2) A power-operated door, its control mechanisms and associated equipment must be designed, constructed and maintained so that the opening and closing force of the door, or its method of operation, is unlikely to injure or trap any person.

2.2(2A) Without limiting the means of compliance with 2.2(2) a power-operated door complies with 2.2(2) if:

a) the door is:

1. located at the left-front of the vehicle; and

2. within the driver’s direct line of sight; and

3. opened and closed by means of a driver-operated control; or

b)in the event that the door closes onto part of a person, the person can readily extract the trapped part.

Taken from:

Power-operated doors

A power-operated door is such that it is likely to injure or trap a person, eg by excessive opening or closing force, or damage or deterioration (Note 1).

Test bar dimensions:

Section of height 60mm, width 30mm with corners radiused to 5mm and tapered at one end over a length of 300mm from a thickness of 30mm to a thickness of 5mm (Figure 5-1-1). Surface to be smooth but shall not be treated with polish or lubricated.

Figure 5-1-1

Figure 5-1-1. Test bar dimensions
Note 1

A power-operated door may be deemed acceptable in terms of potential injury or entrapment of a person due to excessive closing force if:

a) the door is located at the left-front of the vehicle within the driver’s clear view from his seat (without using mirrors or CCTV), and is opened and closed by means of a driver-operated control, or

b) the door automatically opens when it meets an obstruction, and remains open until being closed using the driver-operated control, or

c) in the event that the door closes onto part of a person, the person can readily extract the trapped part.

Page amended 1 November 2014 (see amendment details).

6 Michelin X Multiway tyres

Reference

Clarification

Michelin X Multiway tyres are like a cross between directional and normal highway tyres however the direction of rotation can be in either direction - meaning the tyre fits into the normal highway tread type classification.

The arrow with the larger head indicates the manufacturer’s preferred direction of rotation for the tyre, optimizing tread wear performance. The manufacturer recommends that, especially when new, tyres marked with a bi-directional arrow should be run in the direction of rotation indicated by the larger arrow head.

Multiway arrow

However, if a tyre marked with the bi-directional arrow shows an irregular wear profile, (for example, a sloped wear pattern) then it may be turned on the rim and run in the direction of the smaller arrow head with no detriment to any other performance criteria. In cases such as this, the manufacturer recommends that all tyres on the same axle should be turned on the rim such that all arrows face in the same direction.

Inspection

A vehicle presented that has these tyres is subject to the usual in-service requirements for normal highway tread type tyres.

  • Despite the manufacturer’s recommendation, there is no reason for rejection if the bi-directional arrows do not face in the same direction.
  • There is no reason for rejection if tyres with bi-directional arrows are mixed on the same axle with other Normal Highway tread type tyres.
  • Tyres with bi-directional arrows cannot be mixed with asymmetric or directional tyres.

Michelin XTyre

Page added 10 June 2016 (see details)

7 Stock crate certification

It is important that stock crate retention is correctly certified to the appropriate standard. This technical bulletin provides explanations of different types of stock crates (fitted to a vehicle with a GVM of 6000 kg or more) their attachments, how to identify them, and how to identify their certification.

References

Stock crate attachment types

There are three common ways that stock crates are attached to heavy motor vehicles:

  • J-hook
  • Monocoque
  • Deck-mounted.

J-hook

The crate attachment is easy to see as the J-hooks sit on the outside (Figure 7-1-1).

Figure 7-1-1. J-hook stock crate

J-hook

The stock crate is not a vehicle therefore the actual crate J-hook mountings and J-hooks cannot be certified with an LT400. The design can be certified with a design certificate and a plate or label attached to the stock crate.

The design certification for the stock crate anchorage is catered for with an design certificate and the certificate will be held on file by the stock crate manufacturer.

The stock crate identification plate or label needs to have all of the following information:

  • Company name
  • Serial number
  • Date of manufacture
  • J-hook capacity load
  • J-hook capacity individual
  • Number per side.

A certificate of fitness inspector can be satisfied in regard to the certification of the stock crate J-hook mountings if a plate or label providing all the information above is attached to the crate and there is a separate load anchorage certification plate fitted to the vehicle to cover the deck mounting points (coaming rail) used to secure the stock crate.

Monocoque

A stock crate and vehicle constructed as one integral assembly, usually without a rigid chassis, with the wheel and axle assemblies , suspension and steer dolly (in the case of a full trailer) attached directly to the crate assembly.  The stock crate fits directly to the chassis and there are no coaming rails or tie rails. (Figure 7-1-2).

Figure 7-1-2. Monocoque stock transfer vehicle

This must be certified to NZS5413.

Monocoque

Deck-mounted

Another common attachment is the deck-mounted stock crate. There are no external attachments and the fitment looks very similar to monocoque except that the crate sits on a deck which is visible with a coaming rail and general fitment of load anchorages and tie rails (Figure 7-1-3).

Figure 7-1-3. Deck-mounted stock crate

Deck mounted

Requirements for certification of deck mounted stock crates.

The stock crate is not a vehicle therefore the actual crate bolt mountings and bolts cannot be certified with an LT400. The design can be certified with a design certificate and a plate or label attached to the stock crate.

The design certification for the stock crate anchorage is catered for with an engineer’s design certificate and the engineers certificate will be held on file by the stock crate manufacturer.

The stock crate identification plate or label needs to have all of the following information:

  • Company name
  • Serial number
  • Date of manufacture
  • Restraint capacity load
  • Restraint capacity individual
  • Number per side

A certificate of fitness inspector can be satisfied in regard to the certification of the stock crate bolted mountings if a plate or label providing all the information above is attached to the crate and there is a separate load anchorage certification plate fitted to the vehicle to cover the deck mounting points used to secure the stock crate.

Sample stock crate plate design

plate

Notes
  • Any vehicles inspected after 1/11/2016 that do not meet the requirements but are fit for purpose (inspector has completed a detailed visual inspection and is confident that the anchorage points are in good condition) may be passed for CoF but must have certification completed (in line with this technical bulletin) before next CoF. Notes must be recorded showing the completion of this inspection and actions needed to be taken before next CoF.
  • Any vehicles presented for inspection 1 year after 1/11/2016 will not pass for CoF without correct certification.
  • All vehicles presented for first time entry compliance must meet these requirements for stock crate/load anchorage immediately.

Page amended 1 November 2017 (see amendment details).

8 Tipper bodies fitted to new imported trucks (first registered in New Zealand)

Vehicle inspection requirements manual reference

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM.

Application

Under the Land Transport Rule: Heavy Vehicles 2004, a modification or repair that affects the vehicle structure must be inspected and certified by a heavy vehicle specialist certifier (HVSC). Any of the vehicles listed in the table below can be accepted as meeting this requirement and do not need to be certified by an HVSC.

Vehicles fitted with manufacturer-equipped tipper bodies that do not require an LT400

Hino
MakeModelSubmodel
HinoModel 300XZU605R-HKTMSQ3
HinoModel 300XZU605R-HKMMSQ3
HinoModel 300XZU710R-HKFQTQ3
HinoModel 300XZU710R-HKFTTQ3
Hino Model 300XZU710R-HKTRSQ3D
HinoModel 300XZU730R-QKFTTQ3
HinoModel 300XZU730R-QKFTTQ3
HinoModel 500FC7JEMM-ANU
HinoModel 500FC7JGMA-ANU
HinoModel 500FC2AE1M-DBAAE
HinoModel 500FC2AG1A-DBAAE
Isuzu

Make

Model

Isuzu

NLR

Isuzu

NMR

Isuzu

NPR

Isuzu

NQR

Isuzu

FRR

Foton
MakeModel Model code
Foton Aumark BJ1051 (2.8L) - BJ1051V9JD4-FP TIPPER
FotonAumarkBJ1051 (2.8L) - BJ1051V9JD4-FP PANTECH WITH TAIL LIFT
FotonAumarkBJ1079 (3.8L) - BJ1079VDJE6-FP PANTECH WITH TAIL LIFT
FotonAumarkBJ1079A (3.8L) - BJ1079VDJE6-FP PANTECH WITH TAIL LIFT
FotonAumarkBJ1099VEJEA-FP PANTECH WITH TAIL LIFT
Mitsubishi Fuso/Fuso

Make

Local Model Code

Model Name

MITSUBISHI FUSO

FE150T

Canter 3.5t Tipper

MITSUBISHI FUSO

FEA55T1

Canter 2.5T Tipper

MITSUBISHI FUSO

FEC60T1

Canter 3.0t Tipper

MITSUBISHI FUSO

FEC65T1

Canter 3.5t Tipper

MITSUBISHI FUSO

FEC75T1

CANTER  4X2 TIPPER

FUSO

FEA61BR

Canter 616 - City Tipper

FUSO

FEC81CR

Canter 616/716/816 - Tipper

FUSO

FIV2PFX2RFBAXXT

Fighter  FI1217C Tipper

FUSO

FIV2PFX2RFBA(T)

Enduro FI1217 Tipper

FUSO

FJX3WK2RFBAXXT

Fighter FJ2528C TIPPER

FUSO

FJX3WK2RFBA(T)

Enduro FJ2528 Tipper

FUSO

FOX2WN

Enduro FO3128 Tipper

FUSO

FK62FH

Fighter FK1125 Tipper

Trucks fitted with ShinMaywa tipper bodies will be fitted with a plate as shown in the sample below.

ShinMaywa

Trucks fitted with Fuso tipper bodies can be fitted with either the plate shown below or the ShinMaywa body builders plate (above).

Page updated 13 July 2020 (see details).

9 Park brake inspection and 4085D requirements


VIRM reference

Heavy vehicles 8-1: Service brake, parking brake and heavy vehicle emergency brake

Background

The 4085D Operator statement of compliance with maintenance requirements for parking brake assemblies form is used by a heavy vehicle operator to confirm a powered heavy vehicle’s parking brake assembly has been inspected/serviced by a technician in last two years and is in good working condition. The need for this inspection has come about due to a number of run-away trucks that have led to a fatal or serious injury crash after the parking brake has been applied.

The issue has been traced to the parking brake application valve beside the driver’s seat on many truck, bus and motorhome vehicles. The valve wears out internally through dust and moisture ingress over time and can cause the valve detent to stick in the neck portion and not fully engage with the lock. As the driver gets out of the vehicle the valve can be knocked or on occasions get caught in the driver’s clothing releasing the lever.

There is also evidence that carden shaft brake assemblies have caused some trucks to run away even when the lever is applied. This is due to a number of factors including a lack of maintenance that reduces the ability of the brake to hold the vehicle and load, especially in steep inclines and where the lever feels fully applied but resistance in the linkages reduces the application of the brake.

This bulletin has been produced to supplement information provided to the repair industry and should be considered in inspecting all parts of the parking brake system.

Parking brake inspection

What are the indicators that might make a vehicle inspector doubt the condition of a parking brake assembly?

A parking brake is generally serviceable (except for some sealed parking brake valves) with items that are susceptible to wear, degradation and ingress of dust and dirt.

Not all parking brake assemblies are easily accessible but signs that may point to no recent maintenance include:

  • rusted bolts, screws, clevis pins or linkages which activate the brakes
  • dust, dirt, seat foam or general rubbish around the lever assembly
  • excessive resistance in applying the parking brake
  • a lack of feel from the detent or lock position when applying the lever of an air parking brake valve.
Are there any parts within the assembly that are more prone to cause problems than others?

The risk is more with the age of the vehicle (particularly older vehicles that have not been regularly serviced) and those working in dusty operations such as concrete mixer trucks and quarry trucks.

Pay particular attention to the application lever and any detents, ratchet or other mechanical locks designed to hold the lever in its applied position.

Are there specific makes/models that should be paid close attention to?

Vehicle inspectors should pay attention to all parking brake assemblies. All makes or models should be treated equally. As mentioned above, vehicles working in dusty operations such as concrete mixer trucks and quarry trucks are higher risk.

The Transport Agency has published safety alerts covering some Nissan trucks that require 12-monthly parking brake checks and maintenance.

4085D requirement scenarios

If a vehicle inspector doubts the maintenance of a parking brake assembly, they can request that the 4085D form be presented to provide proof of inspection/servicing in the last two years (once the vehicle exceeds two years from date of first registration in New Zealand, or every CoF from date of first registration if entry certified as a used vehicle).

If an operator does not have a valid 4085D to present, then the vehicle inspector can issue a 28-day permit instead, to allow the operator to have the parking brake maintenance carried out and get a 4085D completed.

If you request a 4085D because you doubt the parking brake maintenance, but an operator says that the parking brake was recently serviced, you can tell the operator they can get the service agent to fill in the form with regard to the last service – they don't have to get the servicing done on the parking brake again.

When do you need to ask the operator of a powered heavy vehicle (a heavy truck, bus or motorhome above 3500kg) for a 4085D?
  • The vehicle passes the certificate of fitness (CoF) for parking brake performance (i.e. passes a roller brake test or stall test) and passes all other CoF requirements, but the vehicle inspector (VI) has doubts about the parking brake maintenance so can request a completed 4085D form and issue a 28-day CoF permit.
  • The vehicle fails the CoF test for parking brake performance under the reasons for rejection. This requires the VI to fail the vehicle and request a 4085D form.
  • The vehicle passes the parking brake performance test and fails on another CoF item and the VI has doubts about the parking brake maintenance so must fail the CoF and also request a 4085D form is required.
When do you NOT need to ask the operator of a powered heavy vehicle for a 4085D?
  • The vehicle passes its CoF for parking brake performance (ie it passes a roller brake test or stall test) and passes all other CoF requirements and the VI has no doubts about parking brake maintenance so can issue full CoF.
  • The vehicle passes the parking brake performance test and fails on another CoF item and the VI has no doubts about the parking brake maintenance. The VI fails the CoF for the other item(s) and no 4085D form is required.

Page added 21 February 2020 (see amendment details).