Correct as at 20th February 2020. It may be superseded at any time.

Extract taken from: NZTA Vehicle Portal > VIRMs > Entry certification > Technical bulletins

4 Technical bulletins

1 Replacement parts

Replaces Infosheet 1.81 Replacement parts

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in determining compliance of a vehicle.

Application

This document applies to any vehicle undergoing entry-level certification that has had parts, components or systems replaced during a repair or modification.

Safety concern

Vehicles entering New Zealand must have been manufactured to comply with required safety standards. Compliance with these standards ensures that a safety critical component will perform as intended. Vehicles and their systems, parts and components must remain within safe tolerance of their state when manufactured. This helps to ensure the safety of vehicles used on New Zealand roads.

Use of correct replacement parts is vital to achieving safe tolerance. A vehicle must continue to comply with safety standards and equipment requirements when it is repaired, or components are added or replaced.

Inspection

Vehicle inspectors must check whether or not the component being replaced has to meet an approved standard. Standards will vary according to the vehicle’s year of manufacture (and any modifications). The replacement part must meet the same standard as the original part, or a later version. Examples include lights, tyres, seatbelts and glazing.

If there is no specific standard for the individual component, but there is a standard for the system the component is a part of, the vehicle inspector must ensure that any replacement parts used enable the system to continue to meet the standard, and return the vehicle to safe tolerance of its state when manufactured. Examples include brake systems, frontal impact protection systems and seatbelt anchorage attachment points.

Braking systems: Brake pads and shoes are critical components in relation to returning the braking system to within safe tolerance of its state when manufactured.

Frontal impact protection systems: It is important that structural panel replacement is carried out using complying parts and in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions (or, where these are not available, alternative repair industry standards such as I-Car). Replacement panels and welding must duplicate the original structure.

Seatbelt anchorages: Any repairs of the body or components affecting the supporting structure for seatbelt anchorages must restore these items to their original strength.

If there is no specific standard for the component or the system of which the component is a part, components must be fit for purpose. This generally applies to older vehicles, although there are components that are important to the safety of a vehicle but are not covered by a prescribed standard in new vehicles. Examples include steering and suspension components.

Recommendation

The NZ Transport Agency recommends that parts suppliers and repairers must be able to provide proof that replacement parts meet legal requirements. This could consist of de-registration papers of the donor vehicle for used body parts, standards markings, or proof that the vehicle used for parts was legally registered in New Zealand.

2 Water- or fire-damaged vehicles

Applicable legislation
Application
  • This document applies to any vehicle undergoing entry-level (including re-entry) certification that may have suffered water or fire damage.
Note 1

Water- or fire-damaged vehicles imported from Japan may not have been de-registered in Japan. This means that vehicles imported from Japan presented with registration documents only are more ‘at risk’ vehicles.

Note 2

Do not rule out the possibility that privately imported vehicles have suffered water or fire damage.

Vehicles flagged at the border

If water or fire damage is detected on a vehicle during a border inspection, the vehicle will be flagged as damaged and the details forwarded to the NZTA's Data Integrity team (Lead Specialist, Border Checks).

The Lead Specialist will then record a water or fire damage message in the vehicle notes on LANDATA. This message reads as follows:

‘Water-damaged vehicle. Must be certified by a specialist repair certifier.’

or

'Fire damaged vehicle. Must be certified by a specialist repair certifier. Not to be certified by an IO without approval from NZTA NO.'

Any vehicle that has a water or fire damage message attached must be referred to a specialist repair certifier before processing for registration, as the vehicle may not be able to be economically repaired.

Note 3

Specialist repair certifier in this case means a light vehicle repair certifier or heavy vehicle specialist certifier as applicable to the vehicle class.

Water or fire damage detected by IOs

If an IO carrying out entry-level certification detects water or fire damage on a vehicle that has not been flagged for damage at the border, the vehicle must be referred to a specialist repair certifier. The IO must notify the NZTA’s Assessments team (Border Checks – phone 0800 804 580, fax 06 953 6267), so that the vehicle can be added to the list of water and fire damaged vehicles recorded on the website. They must also record the water or fire damage message (as above) in the vehicle notes on LANDATA.

Documentation to be provided with water or fire damaged vehicles
Light vehicles

a) The following documents must be presented with a water-damaged vehicle before it can be processed for registration:

b) The following documents must be presented with a fire-damaged vehicle before it can be processed for registration:

Heavy vehicles

Documentation to be provided with water or fire damaged vehicles: a) The following documents must be presented with a water-damaged vehicle before it can be processed for registration:

  • An LT400.

b) The following documents must be presented with a fire-damaged vehicle before it can be processed for registration:

  • An LT400.

Page updated 21 March 2018 (see details).

3 Vehicles modified to change vehicle class

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in determining vehicle class as defined in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to vehicles undergoing entry certification in New Zealand that have been modified in such a way that the class of vehicle may have changed from when it was manufactured.

Inspection
Step one

The vehicle inspector must determine the original class of the vehicle, as it was manufactured.

Step two

The vehicle inspector must determine whether or not the vehicle complied with legal requirements for entering service in New Zealand, in its original condition (as manufactured).

If the vehicle did not comply with New Zealand legal requirements when it was manufactured, it cannot be certified for entry into New Zealand as another vehicle class.

  • For example, an MA class vehicle that did not comply with a frontal impact standard could not be certified as an NA class vehicle.
Step three

If the vehicle complied with New Zealand legal requirements in its original condition, the vehicle inspector must determine whether or not the modified vehicle complies with legal requirements for vehicles operating in-service in New Zealand.

If a vehicle has modifications that exceed the low volume vehicle (LVV) or heavy vehicle thresholds, it must undergo LVV or HVS certification according to its new class, or be re-configured back to manufacturer’s specifications.

Step four

The vehicle should be recorded in LANDATA as its original new class. A note must be added to the vehicle record, stating that vehicle modifications have resulted in a change of class (and identify the previous class).

Page amended 1 June 2019 (see amendment details).

4 Identifying a Honda Gyro

Application

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in identifying a Honda Gyro to determine applicable inspection requirements.

A Honda Gyro is a three-wheeled vehicle which requires design compliance and must be declared as a motorcycle by the NZTA in order to be registered for in-service operation in New Zealand.

Identification

The New Zealand representative of Blue Wing Honda has advised the NZTA that Honda agents identify the Honda Gyro by its frame number.

It can also be recognised by the distinctive articulating joint that allows the whole front passenger portion of the vehicle to pivot and tilt when cornering.

A Honda Gyro:

  • has one wheel at the front and two wheels at the rear, and
  • has a mass not exceeding one tonne, and
  • has an engine output exceeding 2kW (or 50ml), and
  • has a maximum speed capability exceeding 50km/h.

Therefore, a Honda Gyro can be classed as an LE1 vehicle under Table A of Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Standards Compliance 2002.

For registration purposes, the Honda Gyro is a vehicle type 11 (motorcycle).

Inspection

If a vehicle presented for entry certification is identified as a Honda Gyro, it must be declared a motorcycle by the NZTA. Applications must be made to:

Vehicle Standards
NZ Transport Agency
Private Bag 6995
Wellington 6141

Attention: Senior Engineer, Vehicles Standards team

An LT4085 Vehicle compliance certificate must be completed for the vehicle. It must meet entry-level certification requirements for class LE1 vehicles and undergo periodic in-service inspections (warrant of fitness or certificate of fitness).

To operate and inspect the vehicle, the vehicle inspector must hold a motorcycle licence.

5 Inspection requirements for temporary vehicle imports


Application

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors carrying out entry-level inspections on vehicles imported for temporary use on New Zealand roads.

Requirements for temporarily importing a vehicle

A temporary vehicle import is a vehicle brought into New Zealand by a resident of another country, usually for a maximum of 12 months, while remaining registered in its country of origin.

The vehicle must be exported from New Zealand within the allowed temporary entry period.

Before a vehicle is released to its owner, it must be inspected by the Quarantine Service of the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF).

The vehicle must be licensed in New Zealand as an overseas visitor’s vehicle. In addition, the vehicle’s registration in its country of origin must remain current for the duration of its stay in New Zealand, and must remain in the name of the person who imported the vehicle into New Zealand. The overseas registration plates must remain on the vehicle; it does not need New Zealand plates.

When presenting a temporary import, the vehicle importer must:

  • fill out an Application for registration of an overseas visitor’s vehicle (form MR2C)
  • provide proof that the vehicle is currently registered in his/her name in its country of origin (eg by providing original vehicle registration documents)
  • show a carnet de passage or temporary import entry
  • provide identification that shows his/her name, date of birth and signature
  • pay an Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) levy (but none of the other registration and licensing fees).

A temporarily imported vehicle does not need to meet New Zealand’s requirements for entry certification. However, an entry certifier must carry out a basic safety inspection before issuing a warrant of fitness (WoF) or certificate of fitness (CoF) label for the vehicle.

Background

In 1958, New Zealand became a contracting state of the Geneva Convention. The Convention on road traffic was signed in September 1949. This convention developed several provisions to promote the safety of international traffic, outlined below.

Generally speaking, the vehicle does not need to comply with New Zealand approved standards, or requirements for specialist certification (eg low volume vehicle certification for modifications). It must at least comply with the provisions of the Geneva Convention. It should meet the basic safety requirements for condition and performance listed in the VIRM: In-service certification.

Applicable legislation

Geneva Convention Chapter IV – Provisions applicable to motor vehicles and trailers in international traffic.

Article 22: Every motor vehicle and trailer must be in good working order and safe mechanical condition so as not to endanger the driver or vehicle occupants or other road users, or cause damage to public or private property. Inspection - Brake requirements for temporarily imported group M and N vehicles.

Mandatory equipment

1. A vehicle must be fitted with a service brake capable of slowing the vehicle and bringing it to a controlled stop under any conditions of loading, on any gradient that the vehicle may be operated on, in an efficient, safe and rapid way.

2. A vehicle must be fitted with a parking brake capable of bringing the vehicle to a controlled stop if the service brake fails.

Condition and performance

3. The brakes fitted to a vehicle must be capable of acting on at least half of the wheels, and brake performance must be balanced on each side of the longitudinal axis of the vehicle.

4. At least half of the braking devices must act on braking surfaces directly attached to the wheels (or through parts not liable to fail).

5. Braking surfaces must be in good condition, and must always be connected with the wheels of the vehicle in such a way that it is not possible to disconnect them, other than momentarily by means of clutch, gearbox or free wheel.

6. The parking brake must be readily applicable and capable of remaining applied for an indefinite period even in the absence of the driver.


Braking requirements for temporarily imported group L vehicles
Mandatory equipment

1. A group L vehicle must be fitted with two braking devices operated by hand or foot, capable of slowing the vehicle and bringing it to a controlled stop in an efficient, safe and rapid way.


Brake requirements for temporarily imported trailers
Mandatory equipment

1. A combination of a motor vehicle and one or more trailers must be fitted with a braking device capable of slowing the vehicle and bringing it to a controlled stop under any conditions of loading, on any gradient that the vehicle may be operated on, in an efficient, safe and rapid way. A trailer must have a braking device that acts on at least half of the wheels, balanced on each side of the longitudinal axis of the vehicle, as follows:

a) The braking device for a class TA or TB trailer may operate as an overrun braking device (ie the trailer is stopped by moving upon the stopped towing vehicle).

b) The braking device for a class TC or TD trailer must be capable of being operated when the service brake of the towing vehicle is applied.

2. The braking device must be capable of preventing the rotation of the wheels when the trailer is uncoupled.

3. A trailer fitted with a braking device must be equipped with a breakaway brake (Note 1).

Note 1

Two-wheeled camping trailers or light luggage trailers do not require a breakaway brake if they are fitted with a secondary attachment, such as a safety chain.


Lighting requirements for temporarily imported group M and N vehicles
Mandatory equipment

1. A vehicle must be fitted with main-beam headlamps bright enough to illuminate the road ahead for 100m in normal darkness (Note 2).

2. A vehicle must be fitted with two white or yellow dipped-beam headlamps bright enough to illuminate the road ahead for 30m in normal darkness without causing significant dazzle to other road users (Note 2).

3. A vehicle must be fitted with two white forward-facing position lamps visible from 150m in normal darkness without causing significant dazzle to other road users. These lamps must be mounted as far towards each side of the vehicle as practicable, no further than 400mm from the extreme outer edges of the vehicle.

4. A vehicle must be fitted with at least one red rearward-facing position lamp, visible from 150m from the rear of the vehicle in normal darkness.

5. A vehicle must be fitted with a rear registration plate illumination lamp that illuminates the figures and letters of the plate so that they are visible from 20m from the rear of the vehicle in normal darkness.

6. A vehicle must be fitted with two red rear reflectors symmetrically mounted as far towards each side of the vehicle as practicable, no further than 400mm from the extreme outer edges of the vehicle. Rear reflectors must be visible from 100m in normal darkness when illuminated by means of two main-beam headlamps.

7. A vehicle must be fitted with a least one red or amber stop light mounted at the rear of the vehicle. A stop light must operate when the service brake is applied. If the stop light is red, the light intensity must be greater than that of the rearward-facing position lamps.

Permitted equipment

8. A vehicle may be fitted with direction indicators as follows:

a) a moveable arm protruding beyond each side of the vehicle and illuminated by a steady amber light when the arm is in the horizontal position, or

b) a constantly blinking or flashing amber light mounted on each side of the vehicle, or

c) a constantly blinking or flashing light at each side of the front and rear of the vehicle. These lights must be white or orange towards the front of the vehicle, and red or orange towards the rear of the vehicle.

Note 2

On vehicles from left-hand drive countries the headlamps dip to the right. To avoid blinding oncoming traffic, the headlamps must be adjusted so they do not dip to the right. Generally, asymmetric beam headlamps will also need to be modified to remove the right-hand flick-up, for example by applying some form of masking, such as plastic overlay, or fitting different bulbs.


Lighting requirements for temporarily imported motorcycles
Mandatory equipment

1. A motorcycle of class LC, LD, LE1 or LE2 must be fitted with at least one main-beam headlamp bright enough to illuminate the road ahead for 100m in normal darkness.

2. A motorcycle of class LC, LD, LE1 or LE2 must be fitted with a least one dipped-beam headlamp bright enough to illuminate the road ahead for 30m in normal darkness without causing significant dazzle to other road users.

3. A motorcycle of class LD must be fitted with two white forward-facing position lamps visible from 150m in normal darkness without causing significant dazzle to other road users. These lamps must be mounted as far towards each side of the vehicle as practicable, no further than 400mm from the extreme outer edges of the vehicle.

4. A motorcycle must be fitted with at least one red rearward-facing position lamp, visible from 150m from the rear of the vehicle in normal darkness.

5. A motorcycle must be fitted with a rear registration plate illumination lamp that illuminates the figures and letters of the plate so that they are visible from 20m to the rear of the vehicle in normal darkness.

6. Rear reflectors must be fitted to the following vehicles:

a) Class LD vehicles must be fitted with two red rear reflectors symmetrically mounted as far towards each side of the vehicle as practicable, no further than 400mm from the extreme outer edges of the vehicle.

b) Class LC, LE1 and LE2 vehicles must be fitted with one red rear reflector symmetrically mounted as far towards each side of the vehicle as practicable, no further than 400mm from the extreme outer edges of the vehicle.

  • Rear reflectors must be visible from 100m in normal darkness when illuminated by means of two main-beam headlamps.
Permitted equipment

7. A motorcycle may be fitted with direction indicators as follows:

a) a moveable arm protruding beyond each side of the vehicle and illuminated by a steady amber light when the arm is in the horizontal position, or

b) a constantly blinking or flashing amber light mounted on each side of the vehicle, or

c) a constantly blinking or flashing light at each side of the front and rear of the vehicle. These lights must be white or orange towards the front of the vehicle, and red or orange towards the rear of the vehicle.


Lighting requirements for trailers
Mandatory equipment

1. A trailer at the end of a combination of vehicles must be fitted with at least one red rearward-facing position lamp, visible from 150m from the rear of the vehicle in normal darkness.

2. A trailer must be fitted with a rear registration plate illumination lamp that illuminates the figures and letters of the plate so that they are visible from 20m to the rear of the vehicle in normal darkness.

3. A trailer must be fitted with two red rear reflectors visible from 100m in normal darkness when illuminated by means of two main-beam headlamps.

4. A trailer at the end of a combination of vehicles must be fitted with a least one red or amber stop light mounted at the rear of the vehicle, unless the stop light of the towing vehicle is visible from the rear. A stop light must operate when the service brake is applied. If the stop light is red, the intensity of the light output must be greater than that of the rearward-facing position lamps.

Permitted equipment

5. A trailer may be fitted with direction indicators as follows:

a) a moveable arm protruding beyond each side of the vehicle and illuminated by a steady amber light when the arm is in the horizontal position, or

b) a constantly blinking or flashing amber light mounted on each side of the vehicle, or

c) a constantly blinking or flashing light at each side of the front and rear of the vehicle. These lights must be white or amber towards the front of the vehicle, and red or amber towards the rear of the vehicle.


Other technical requirements for temporarily imported group M and N vehicles
Mandatory equipment

1. A vehicle must be equipped with a strong steering system that allows the vehicle to be turned easily, quickly and with certainty.

2. A vehicle must be equipped with at least one driving mirror of adequate size and location to provide the driver with a clear view to the rear of the vehicle.

3. A vehicle must be fitted with at least one audible warning device (horn) that is not:

a) a bell, or

b) a gong, or

c) a siren, or

d) any other loud-toned device.

4. Windscreens, where fitted, must be made of a stable, transparent material that is not likely to produce sharp splinters if broken. Objects must not appear distorted when viewed through this material.

5. Where a vehicle is fitted with a windscreen, it must have at least one efficient windscreen wiper that operates without constant control of the driver.

6. A vehicle must be fitted with an exhaust silencer system that operates constantly and cannot be interrupted by the driver while on the road.

7. A vehicle must be fitted with pneumatic tyres.


General safety provisions

1. The construction of a vehicle must not obstruct the driver’s vision to the front, right or left of the vehicle.

2. As far as possible, the machinery or equipment of a vehicle must not:

a) be at risk of fire or explosion, or

b) cause the emission of noxious gases or offensive fumes, or

c) produce excessive or disturbing noise, or

d) increase the risk of a collision and/or damage caused in a collision.

Note 3

Temporarily imported vehicles do not have to meet requirements for modification, therefore, low volume vehicle (LVV) or heavy vehicle specialist certification is not required. However, if a vehicle inspector feels that a vehicle is unsafe to operate, he/she may seek advice from a low volume vehicle or heavy vehicle specialist certifier.

6 Auxiliary bars

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to class MA, MB or MC vehicles fitted with auxiliary bars (eg bullbars) undergoing entry certification in New Zealand. Auxiliary bars fitted to any class of vehicle may affect compliance with requirements for external projections and/or frontal impact systems.

Safety concern

Fitting auxiliary bars to vehicles with frontal impact protection systems may have a negative effect on the performance of frontal impact protection features, such as airbags or crush-zones.

Inspection

If auxiliary bars are fitted to any vehicle, the risk of injury to others must be minimised. This means that the vehicle must comply with the requirements for condition, performance and modification set out in the VIRM: In-service certification, section 2-1.

A vehicle inspector may refuse to certify a vehicle that is fitted with an auxiliary bar if he/she believes that it is likely to cause injury or affect the driver’s control of the vehicle.

Auxiliary bars fitted to Mitsubishi RVRs

NZ Transport Agency has been advised by Mitsubishi Motors New Zealand that the following Mitsubishi RVR models were factory-fitted with auxiliary bullbars:

  • N11W
  • N21W
  • N28W
  • N13W
  • N23W
  • N28WG

If a vehicle inspector is presented with a vehicle from one of these model ranges fitted with an original equipment (OE) bullbar, the vehicle may be passed.

The following Mitsubishi RVR models were not factory-fitted with bullbars:

  • N61W
  • N71WG
  • N74WG
  • N64WG
  • N73WG
 

If a vehicle inspector is presented with a vehicle from one of these model ranges fitted with a bullbar, confirmation that the bullbar will not affect the vehicle’s frontal impact compliance is required. If it cannot be supplied, the vehicle cannot pass the inspection until the bullbar has been removed.

Page updated 12 October 2018 (see details)

7 Frontal impact standard exemptions

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to specific model ranges of class MA, MB or MC vehicles manufactured by Toyota Japan, Nissan Japan and Mazda/Ford Japan that are exempt from the requirement to meet a specified frontal impact vehicle standard under the New Zealand Gazette notice au3660.

Inspection

Vehicles manufactured by:

  • Toyota Japan, in the Estima, Lucida or Emina families, and
  • Nissan Japan, in the Serena or Largo families, and
  • Mazda/Ford Japan, in the Bongo, Friendee or Freda families

are exempt from the requirement to meet an approved frontal impact standard (as specified in Table 3-2-1 of the VIRM: Entry certification) if the vehicle’s chassis number is included in the ranges identified below.

Vehicle make/model

Industry model code

Chassis number

Range from

Range to

Toyota Japan

  • Estima
  • Lucida
  • Emina

CXR10G
CXR11G
CXR20G
CXR21G
TCR10G
TCR10W
TCR11G
TCR11W
TCR20G
TCR20W
TCR21G
TCR21W

CXR10-0001177
CXR11-0001035
CXR20-0001213
CXR21-0001043
TCR10-1034094
TCR10-1034093
TCR11-0034215
TCR11-0034215
TCR20-1008042
TCR20-1008042
TCR21-0020187
TCR21-0020187

CXR10-0146676
CXR11-0024109
CXR20-0133547
CXR21-0030697
TCR10-1353266
TCR10-1353266
TCR11-0141867
TCR11-0141867
TCR20-1119611
TCR20-1119611
TCR21-0074252
TCR21-0074252

Nissan Japan

  • Serena

KBC23
KVC23
KAJC23
KVJC23
KBNC23
KVNC23
KBCC23

KBC23-007242
KVC23-008295
KAJC23-000820
KVCJ23-000434
KBNC23-003346
KVNC23-008389
KBCC23-700516

KBC23-517067
KVC23-501790
KAJC23-400647
KVCJ23-001056
KBNC23-504779
KVNC23-501448
KBCC23-870355

Nissan Japan

  • Largo

W30
CW30
NW30
NCW30
VW30
VNW30

W30-000106
CW30-600108
NW30-000107
NCW30-600111
VW30-000109
VNW30-000110

W30-774375
CW30-810352
NW30-761812
NCW30-810358
VW30-754820
VNW30-754143

Mazda/Ford Japan

  • Bongo
  • Friendee
  • Freda

SG5W
SGEW
SGL3
SGLW
SGL5
SGLR
SG5WF
SGEWF
SGL3F
SGLWF
SGL5F
SGLRF

SG5W-100012
SGEW-100006
SGL3-100005
SGLW-100007
SGL5-100010
SGLR-100011
SG5WF-100002
SGEWF-100001
SGL3F-100002
SGLWF-100002
SGL5F-100002
SGLRF-100002

SG5W-302529
SGEW-301833
SGL3-300306
SGLW-301241
SGL5-300717
SGLR-301776
SG5WF-400230
SGEWF-400274
SGL3F-400005
SGLWF-400043
SGL5F-400016
SGLRF-400067

IMPORTANT: Individual exemptions from frontal impact standards requirements do not need to be made for vehicles that fall within these ranges.

 

8 Frontal impact compliance for Mitsubishi models

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to the frontal impact compliance requirements of Mitsubishi model vehicles undergoing entry certification in New Zealand.

Inspection

It has been determined that the following Mitsubishi models are class MC vehicles, therefore, if a vehicle inspector is presented with a vehicle in the following model ranges, the vehicle is only required to comply with an approved frontal impact standard if it was manufactured on or after 1 October 2003.

Mistubishi RVR Sportsgear vehicles (Note 1)

E-N23WG SRXF

E-N23WG SRHM

Y-N28WG SNXF

E-N23WG SNXF

E-N23WG SNHM

Y-N28WG SRXT

E-N23WG SRXM

E-N23WG SRHF

Y-N28WG SNXT

E-N23WG SNXM

Y-N23WG SNHF

KD-N28WG SRXF

E-N23WG SNUM

Y-N28WG SRXF

KD-N28WG SNXF

 

Mitsubishi Delica Spacegear (four-wheel drive) vehicles

E-PD4W HSEHE2

KD-PE8W HSEXF2

KD-PE8W NSNGF1

E-PD4W HSEHE

KD-PE8W HSEHF2

KD-PE8W NSEGF

E-PD4W NSEGE1

KD-PE8W HSNHF2

KD-PE8W NSEUF

E-PD4W HSEGE

KD-PE8W HSEHF

KD-PE8W NSNUF

E-PD4W NSEGE

KD-PE8W HSNHF

KD-PD8W NSNJF

E-PD4W NSEUE

KD-PE8W HSEGF

KD-PF8W HSEPF2

E-PD6W HSEXE2

KD-PE8W HSNGF

KD-PF8W HSEXF2

E-PD6W HSEHE2

KD-PE8W HSEUF

KD-PF8W HSEHF

E-PD6W NSEHE1

KD-PE8W HSNUF

KD-PF8W HSNHF

E-PF6W HSEXE2

KD-PE8W NSEHF1

KD-PF8W HSEGF

E-PF6W HSEHE

KD-PD8W NSEGF1

Note 1

Not all four-wheel drive Mitsubishi RVR models are class MC vehicles. If a Mitsubishi RVR model is presented that has a full model code not listed above, it is a class MA vehicle; therefore it must comply with an approved frontal impact standard.

9 Frontal impact compliance for Toyota Cavaliers

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to the frontal impact compliance requirements for Toyota Cavalier vehicles undergoing entry certification in New Zealand.

Inspection

Any vehicle that is a Toyota Cavalier of model code TJG00 with a model year of 1996, 1997 or 1998 is exempt from the requirement to prove compliance with one of the approved frontal impact standards specified in section 2.3(4) of Land Transport Rule: Frontal Impact 2001.

The model year of Toyota Cavaliers can be determined by decoding the tenth character of the vehicle identification number (VIN).

The frontal impact compliance status of Toyota Cavalier vehicles, as understood by the NZTA, is described below.

Model year

10th character of VIN

Frontal impact status

1995 or earlier

NA

There is no evidence that these vehicles comply with an approved frontal impact standard. Toyota Cavaliers with a model year of 1995 or earlier will not be eligible for an exemption from frontal impact standard requirements.

1996

T

Toyota Cavaliers with a model year of 1996 can be assumed to comply with an approved frontal impact standard

1997

V

Toyota Cavaliers with a model year of 1997 or 1998 are exempt from the requirement to comply with an approved frontal impact standard

1998

W

1999 or later

X, Y, 1, 2…

Toyota Cavaliers with a model year of 1999 or later comply with an approved frontal impact standard.

10 Inspection for corrosion in Nissan Terrano & Mistral rear floorpan assemblies

References below are to the VIRM: In-service certification.
Reference

General vehicles:

Safety concern

There is concern about corrosion that can occur in Nissan Terrano or Nissan Mistral vehicles of the type whose rear floorpan assembly consists of a two-layer (double-skin) panel. If moisture gets trapped between the two layers of the floorpan, corrosion can occur around the seat or seatbelt anchorages, affecting their integrity. Corrosion can also occur where the under-floor reinforcing panel overlaps the top floor skin.

Clarification

The rear floorpan assembly consists of a two-layer (double-skin) panel. The lower layer is a reinforcing panel spot-welded to the upper layer floor section.

The Terrano has a rear seat with three seating positions. Situated in the rear floor, beneath the seat, are four seatbelt anchorages and two seat anchorages.

The Mistral has a stressed bench seat in the rear (the seatbelts are attached to the seat) with two seat anchorages in the floor and two seatbelt anchorages in the wheel well at the sides of the seat.

Inspection

The inspector must lift the rear seat to examine this area effectively. Any carpet and sound insulating material covering the panel that the seats are mounted on must be pulled back far enough to expose the rear seam of the panel (the area most commonly affected by corrosion). It is important to note that damage may be more extensive than can be detected during this inspection.

The vehicle must fail if any signs of corrosion are detected during the inspection, such as:

  • bubbling of the paint or surface irregularities in the top floor skin or paint
  • a patch repair that has rust around it
  • separation of the reinforcement panel and the top skin
  • discolouration or rust stains at the edges of the reinforcement panel
  • rust holes, or
  • the floorpan on a Nissan Terrano has been ‘patch’ repaired after 8 January 1997, or
  • the floorpan on a Nissan Mistral has been ‘patch’ repaired after 10 November 2003.

A vehicle that has been ‘patch’ repaired before 8 January 1997 (Nissan Terrano) or 10 November 2003 (Nissan Mistral) may pass the inspection provided that:

  • no signs of corrosion are apparent, and
  • there is evidence that the repairs were carried out before the above dates, and
  • the vehicle inspector considers, or there is evidence provided by a qualified panel beater, that the repair is effective and in sound condition.
Repair options

If any corrosion is detected and the vehicle failed, the floorpan must be replaced.

However, for the following models the Low Volume Vehicle Technical Association (LVVTA) has provided an alternative option to floorpan replacement.

Nissan Terrano Model D21
  • installation of the LVVTA rear floor load-bar seatbelt anchorage reinforcement system together with a Low Volume Vehicle certification plate containing the following words in the Body/chassis field: LVVTA ‘Rear floor load-bar seatbelt anchorage reinforcement system’.
Nissan Mistral Model R20 5-door
  • installation of the LVVTA rear floor load-bar seatbelt anchorage reinforcement system together with a Low Volume Vehicle certification plate containing the following words in the Body/chassis field: ‘LVVTA Rear floor load-bar seatbelt anchorage reinforcement system’.

For information about these seatbelt anchorage modifications, and for a list of the LVV certifiers who can certify them, see www.lvvta.org.nz.

11 Inspection of motorhomes

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to the structural inspection of motorhomes undergoing entry certification in New Zealand. It covers the specialist certification requirements for motorhomes undergoing entry certification.

For motorhomes with overseas compliance covering the motorhome conversion, refer to Technical bulletin 41:Entry certification procedures for certain modified vehicles. Exhaust emission standard compliance can be verified by one of the methods specified in Technical Bulletin 28.

Structural inspection

If a motorhome is of a van body type (monocoque construction), it will need to have the trim removed to enable a full structural inspection. If this is impracticable, the entry certifier/vehicle owner may apply to the Transport Agency for an exemption from trim removal requirements (see Reference material 18).

If a motorhome is of a cab/chassis body type with the body mounted on the chassis, the vehicle inspector is only required to visually inspect the vehicle (without disassembly) to ensure general safety requirements are met. However, if the motorhome body contains designated seating positions with certified seatbelt mountings (as is required for most motorhomes built after October 2003), it will need to have the trim removed to enable a full structural inspection. If this is impracticable, the entry certifier/vehicle owner may apply to the Transport Agency for an exemption from trim removal requirements (see Reference material 18).

Specialist certification

Generally, any modifications or repairs to a motorhome that may affect the structural integrity of the vehicle will require specialist certification.

Where vehicles are converted to motorhomes, specialist certification is required unless the vehicle owner can provide documented evidence proving that the modification was a ‘manufacturer’s conversion’.

Examples of modifications or repairs to a motorhome that will normally require specialist certification are:

  • cutting of the roof or bulkhead
  • lengthened chassis rails
  • installation of seatbelt anchorages
  • modification or strengthening of chassis components.

Page amended 1 November 2017 (see amendment details).

12 Inspection of daytime running lamps

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to the lighting equipment (daytime running lamps in particular) fitted to vehicles undergoing entry certification in New Zealand.

Identifying daytime running lamps

When trying to identify daytime running lamps, it may help to check out the beam pattern, the light intensity, the wiring and any markings on the lens.

Beam pattern

For comparison, a fog lamp has a spread beam with a sharp horizontal cutoff and must be fitted in a dipped position.

Light intensity

Under UN/ECE and Australian Design Rules (ADR), a daytime running lamp is generally of low intensity (up to 800 cd max, compared with a headlamp high beam around 80,000–100,000 cd max). There is no hotspot but a blur of light that passes as a beam. The lamps are not required to be dipped, but must turn off when the headlamps are switched on.

Under FMVSS, existing forward-facing lamps (except side lamps and fog lamps) may operate as daytime running lamps. This means that daytime running lamps automatically turn on when the vehicle is started, but turn off when the headlamps are activated. Daytime running lamps fitted as separate lamps must have a light intensity between 500 and 3000 cd.

Wiring

Fog lamps are usually wired so they can operate independently of the headlamps, while daytime running lamps are usually wired so they turn off when the headlamps are switched on.

Markings

Some daytime running lamps may be marked in accordance with a standard (eg an ‘RL’ mark on UN/ECE- and some ADR-compliant lamps, and ‘DRL’ on FMVSS-compliant lamps).

13 Glazing on house-trucks

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This document applies to house-trucks for the purpose of determining compliance with Land Transport Rule: Glazing, Windscreen Wipe and Wash, and Mirrors 1999 (the Glazing Rule).

Requirements

For this purpose, house-trucks should be considered goods vehicles of class NB or NC, depending on their gross vehicle mass (GVM).

Policy
Compliance with approved standards

House-trucks are usually modified vehicles. For example, they may consist of a cab and chassis that was manufactured in 1967, with a housing structure added to the rear in 1980. It is often difficult to determine when the modification took place. This makes it difficult to decide which date should be used to determine the applicable requirements – the year of manufacture of the original vehicle, or the year the modification was carried out.

The Glazing Rule defines year of manufacture as ‘the calendar year in which the construction of the vehicle was completed’.

The NZTA has determined that if any glazing is added or changed as part of the modification, this glazing must comply with requirements for vehicles manufactured at the time of the modification.

The vehicle owner must demonstrate when the modification was carried out.

Condition and performance

Leadlight windows fitted to a house truck are unlikely to comply with general safety requirements, which require glazing to be mechanically sound and strong.

In order to comply with general safety requirements, leadlight windows may be sandwiched between two panes of standard compliant glazing.

14 Seatbelt requirements for rotating seats

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Applicable legislation
Application

This document applies to vehicles fitted with seats that can be rotated or placed to face other directions. Usually, this is to allow front occupants to face rear occupants while the vehicle is stationary.

Safety concern

Although it may be possible to have rotating seats (other than the driver’s seat) face rearward or sideways while traveling on a road, it is only permitted for such seats to be occupied if appropriate seatbelts are fitted.

Seatbelt requirements

Seatbelt requirements depend on the vehicle type, age, number of seats and the location of the seat in the vehicle.

Seats capable of being rotated or placed in other orientations are required to have seatbelts fitted appropriate to the orientation for normal use when the vehicle is travelling on the road (usually forward facing). If the seatbelt cannot be used due to the seat orientation, the seat must not be occupied while the vehicle is moving.

Advisory decals, easily visible to vehicle occupants, must be fitted inside the vehicle to indicate which seating orientations may (or may not) be used while the vehicle is moving.

  • See Figure 1-1-1. Flowchart for determining seatbelt compliance for rotating seats

Determining seatbelt compliance for rotating seats

Figure 1-1-1. Flowchart for determining seatbelt compliance for rotating seats

15 Toyota Hiace seat and seatbelt requirements

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to Toyota Hiace minivan models assembled in New Zealand with type-approved seating for eight passengers installed in the rear seating compartment, to bring the total seating capacity to 11 (10 if the vehicle is approved for passenger service vehicle use).

Toyota Hiace models with factory-installed seating

Table 15-1-1 shows a list provided by Toyota New Zealand of Hiace minibus model codes with factory-installed seating. The ‘local code’ denotes factory-installed seat and seatbelt assemblies.

The seats and seatbelts fitted in vehicles listed in Table 15-1-1 have all been tested and approved to comply with international standards. The seat and seatbelt assemblies for both CKD and CBU models were installed before the vehicles were delivered to dealers.

Table 15-1-1. Toyota Hiace models with factory-installed seating

HIACE TMC model code

Local code

Assembly

New Zealand grade

Production date

Engine code

Transmission

RZH113R-RRMRS

RHMLB

CKD

2.4 ZL

08/89–07/98

2RZ

5M/T

RZH113R-RRPRS

RHMLB

CKD

2.4 ZL

08/89–07/93

2RZ

4H A/T

RZH102R-SRMRS

RHMSW

CKD

SR5 WAGON

08/89–07/91

1RZ

5M/T

RZH103R-SRMRS

RHMKW

CKD

SR5 WAGON

08/91–04/95

2RZ

5M/T

RZH113R-RRMRS

RHMLB

CKD

2.4 MINIBUS

08/89–07/98

2RZ

5M/T

RZH113R-RRMRS

RHPLB

CKD

2.4 MINIBUS

08/89–07/98

2RZ

4A/T

RZH113R-RRPRS

REPLB

CKD

2.4 MINIBUS

08/89–07/93

2RZ

4A/T

LH113R-RRMRS

LHMLB

CKD

2.8 DSL BUS

08/94–0/798

3L

5M/T

LH113R-RRMRS

LHLMV

CBU

2.8 ZL Diesel

05/00–07/00

3L

5M/T

RZH113R-RRMRE

RHLMV

CBU

2.4 ZL Petrol

05/00–

2RZ-E

5M/T

LH113R-RRMRS

LHLMV

CBU

2.8 ZL Diesel

05/00–07/00

3L

5M/T

LH172R-RRMRS

LHMSV

CBU

3.0 ZL Diesel

08/00–

5L

5M/T

Standards

The Toyota Hiace minivan models listed in Table 15-1-1 are fitted with seats and seatbelts complying with the following standards:

  • Seats comply with the requirements of Australian Design Rule (ADR) 3/02.
  • Seatbelts, depending on the date of manufacture, comply with either:

i. New Zealand Standard (NZS) 5401; or

ii. Australian Standard/New Zealand Standard (AS/NZS) 2596.

  • Seatbelt anchorages comply with ADR 5/02.
Certification requirements

The seat and seatbelt installations were not considered to be low volume vehicle (LVV) modifications due to the number of units involved and the fact that the system had been ‘type tested’.

These vehicles were all produced before the NZTA requirement for vans fitted with additional seating to be certified under the LVV code was introduced. Therefore, the vehicles are not fitted with LVV certification plates.

However, Toyota Hiace models fitted with seats and seatbelts on or after January 2002 have been LVV certified, and will have been fitted with LVV certification plates.

16 Replacement seatbelts

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin only applies to vehicles that are required to comply with a frontal impact standard. It gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements:

Application

This document applies to all frontal impact compliant vehicles that are required to have replacement seatbelts fitted as part of entry-level certification in New Zealand.

Inspection

General safety requirements state that seatbelts fitted to a vehicle must comply with requirements relating to condition, performance or modification as set out in the VIRM: In-service certification, section 7-5. If a seatbelt does not meet these conditions, it must be replaced. The replacement part must contain at least all of the features present in the original seatbelt, unless confirmation that fitment of a seatbelt without a certain feature would not affect the safety performance of the vehicle is available from the vehicle manufacturer.

If a vehicle is presented for entry certification, it can have an original equipment (OE) (or equivalent) seatbelt fitted as a replacement. This means that the only time a webbing clamp seatbelt would need to be fitted is if the failed OE seatbelt was a webbing clamp seatbelt.

Replacement seatbelts do not necessarily have to come from the vehicle manufacturer. If a seatbelt manufacturer can confirm that a particular seatbelt is suitable as replacement for a particular vehicle model (and the seatbelt complies with an approved standard), this seatbelt would also be acceptable.

Page amended 28 April 2014 (see amendment details).

17 Seatbelt and seatbelt anchorage standards for heavy motor vehicles

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to heavy motor vehicles undergoing entry certification in New Zealand.

Inspection

Land Transport Rule: Seatbelts and Seatbelt Anchorages requires class NB and NC vehicles manufactured on or after 1 October 2003 to be fitted with seatbelts and seatbelt anchorages as follows:

Seating position

Type of seatbelt required

Type of anchorage required

Driver

A-ELR (Note 2)

3 or 4 point anchorage

Front outer

A-ELR (Note 2)

3 or 4 point anchorage

Front middle

Lap seatbelt

2 point anchorage

Rear outer

Not applicable

Not applicable

Rear middle

Not applicable

Not applicable

Seatbelts must meet one of the standards contained in Table 7-5-1 of the VIRM: Entry certification. Seatbelt anchorages must comply with one of the standards contained in Table 7-5-3 of the VIRM: Entry certification.

Note 1

For the purposes of 2.1(5)(d) of the Rule, manufactured means original manufacture by the source plant. It has nothing to do with any subsequent remanufacture/rebuild/modification/retrofit/vehicle class change. A vehicle originally manufactured before 1 October 2003 will never be required to comply with the requirements in Table 2.4 of the Rule.

Note 2

If a vehicle is fitted with an OE single-sensitive emergency locking retractor lap and diagonal seatbelt, it may remain fitted if it has a plate affixed to the vehicle (see Figure 17-1-1).

Example of plate fitted to a vehicle that may retain single-sensitive front seatbelts

Figure 17-1-1. Example of a plate fitted to a vehicle that may retain a single-sensitive seatbelt

Standards compliance

The Motor Industry Association (MIA) has obtained the relevant information from its members so that entry certifiers will not need to request a statement of compliance for individual vehicles. Information regarding compliance with approved seatbelt and seatbelt anchorage standards for heavy motor vehicles distributed by the MIA and sold through its franchise dealer network has been supplied for the makes and models listed on the following page.

Make

Model

Seatbelt

Seatbelt Anchorage

Caterpillar

CT610, CT630

ADR 4

ADR 5

DAF

 

ECE R16

ECE R14

Ford

 

EEC77/541

ECE R 14

Foton

 

ADR 4

ADR 5

Freightliner

Argosy, Columbia, Century Class, Coronado

FMVSS 209 or ADR 4

FMVSS 210 or ADR 5

Fuso

Canter/Fighter , Shogun Euro 6

Rosa/ HD

Enduro, MP

ADR 4

Japan Technical Standards

ECE R16

ADR 5

Japan Technical Standards

ECE R14

Hino

 

ECE R 16

ADR 5

Hyundai

HD Series

ECE R 16

ECE R14

International

 

FMVSS 209

FMVSS 210

Isuzu

N series

F series

FX series

C & E Series

ADR 4

ECE  R16

ECE  R16

Japan Technical Standards

Or ECE R16

ADR 5

ECE  R14

ECE  R14

Japan Technical Standards

Or ECE R14

Iveco

Stralis,Powerstar & ACCO

Daily & Eurocargo

Trakker

ADR 4

ECE R16

ECE R16

ADR 5

ECE R 14

ECE R14

Kenworth

 

ADR 4

ADR 5

Mack

 

Information contained on compliance plate fitted to the vehicle

MAN

 

ECE R16

ECE R14

Mercedes-Benz

 

ECE R 16

ECE R 14

Mitsubishi Fuso

Canter/Fighter

Rosa/Shogun

ADR 4

Japan Technical Standards

ADR 5

Japan Technical Standards

Nissan Diesel

 

ADR 4

ADR 5

Renault

 

Information contained on compliance plate fitted to the vehicle

RAM

2500 Laramie, 3500 Laramie

ADR 04/05

ADR 05/05

Scania

 

EEC e4*77/541

EEC e4*76/115

Sterling

LT9500, LT7500

FMVSS 209

FMVSS 210

UD Trucks

 

ADR 4/04

ADR 5/05

Volkswagen

 

ECE R16

ECE R14

Volvo

 

Information contained on compliance plate fitted to the vehicle

Western Star

 

FMVSS 209

ADR 5

Table updated July 2019

  • If an entry certifier is presented with a vehicle not covered above, and proof of compliance cannot be established by approved methods, they should contact the vehicle manufacturer directly.
  • A heavy vehicle previously registered in the European Union complies with the seatbelt anchorage standards for heavy vehicles if the vehicle is registered on or after 1 January 2009.

Page amended 28 April 2014 (see amendment details).

18 Seatbelt markings

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to standards markings on seatbelts fitted to vehicles undergoing entry certification in New Zealand.

Clarification

Seatbelts must be labelled with an appropriate standards marking. This helps to determine compliance with an approved standard. Seatbelts may be marked with a code that indicates the type of retractor operation, such as ELR. Table 18-1-1 lists possible seatbelt markings and describes the type of retractor operation indicated by each marking.

Table 18-1-1. Seatbelt retractor operations markings

Seatbelt marking

Seatbelt retractor operation

ELR

Emergency locking retractor

ALR

Automatic locking retractor

ELR/ALR

A combination of emergency and automatic locking retractors, usually used in cars with child restraint seats, but can be used for other purposes.

ELR-V

Single-sensitive (for vehicle sensitivity only) emergency locking retractor

ELR-VW

Dual-sensitive (for both vehicle and web sensitivity) emergency locking retractor

ELR-VW-4N or

ELR-VN

Dual-sensitive emergency locking retractor, but with less sensitivity in the webbing sensitivity function. This makes it ideal for use where an air seat or hydraulic cushion seat is fitted, as the retractor will not constantly lock-up as the operator moves up and down.

Compliant seatbelts that are not required to have standard markings
  • Seatbelts that comply with the Japanese Technical Standard for Seatbelt Assemblies are not required to have standards markings, provided the seatbelts are OE and the vehicle has Japanese type approval.
  • Seatbelts in a fully Australian Design Rule (ADR)-compliant vehicle are not required to have standards markings.
Mislabelling

If the retractor operation of a seatbelt fitted to a vehicle does not match the operation indicated by the seatbelt marking (eg the seatbelt is marked ELR-V but appears to be web sensitive), the vehicle inspector must ignore the possibility of mislabelling, and inspect the performance of the seatbelts in accordance with the manufacturer’s marking.

19 Seatbelt exemptions

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements:

Application

This document applies to all vehicles undergoing entry-level certification in New Zealand that are required to have seatbelts fitted.

Seatbelt exemptions

Under Land Transport Rule: Seatbelts and Seatbelt Anchorages 2002 and the New Zealand Gazette notice au2141 (dated 29 March 2001, page 781), vehicles fitted with certain occupant safety protection systems may be exempt from the requirement to have approved seatbelts of a specified type fitted, as defined in Land Transport Rule: Seatbelts and Seatbelt Anchorages 2002.

This exemption may apply to a vehicle that:

  • complies with an approved frontal impact standard, or
  • is fitted with airbags that are the manufacturer’s OE specifications, or
  • has seatbelt features such as pretensioners or load limiters specifically designed to operate in conjunction with other parts of an integrated occupant protection system.

The exemption only applies to seatbelts fitted as part of the vehicle manufacturer’s OE specifications.

A list of specific seatbelt exemptions is available in the VIRM: In-service certification in Table 7-5-5. The VIRM: In-service certification also lists vehicles that may be exempt from specified seatbelt requirements, provided the vehicle was first registered in New Zealand before 1 January 1991.

Documentation

The inspecting organisation must retain a paper record of the exemption. This may be a note on the vehicle checksheet, or a paper exemption declaration.

A note must be recorded against the vehicle record in LANDATA stating that a single-sensitive seatbelt exemption has been issued.

Evidence of exemption

An entry certifier is required to provide the vehicle owner with evidence that the identified vehicle has been inspected and meets the criteria for a single-sensitive seatbelt exemption. This evidence may be a paper exemption (declaration) or a single-sensitive seatbelt exemption plate.

Paper exemptions

The declaration must be printed on the reverse of a copy of the New Zealand Gazette exemption notice au986. It must also contain the following information:

a) vehicle make, model, year of manufacture and VIN or chassis number, and

b) part numbers or identification numbers of the seatbelts in each sitting position, and

c) a statement declaring that the vehicle qualifies for and meets the conditions of the exemption, and

d) the date of issue, and

e) the vehicle inspector’s name, signature and contact details.

Sample seatbelt exemption declarations are shown in Reference materials 39 and 40.

Single-sensitive seatbelt exemption plate

A vehicle identification number (VIN) plate embossed with the text ‘SSBELTSOK’ followed by the last five digits of the VIN (see Figure 19-1-1) may be affixed to the front face of the right-hand B-pillar.

Example of plate fitted to a vehicle that may retain single-sensitive front seatbelts
Figure 19-1-1 . Example of a single-sensitive seatbelt exemption plate

Both a plate and a paper exemption may be supplied if requested by the vehicle owner.

Note 1

1997 and 1998 Toyota Cavalier vehicles exempt from frontal impact system requirements are also eligible for a seatbelt exemption, provided an SSBELTSOK plate is fitted on the right-hand B-pillar.

20 OE rear upper seatbelt anchorages (with retrofitted seatbelts)

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to the standards compliance of rear upper original equipment (OE) seatbelt anchorages not fitted with seatbelts at the time of manufacture.

Safety concern

It is important that the strength of OE seatbelt anchorages meets the required anchorage strength of retrofitted seatbelts. To ensure that the OE seatbelt anchorages can securely anchor the type of seatbelts fitted, the vehicle inspector must determine that the OE seatbelt anchorage complies with an approved standard.

Inspection

When inspecting a vehicle fitted with an OE-installed rear upper seatbelt anchorage not fitted with a seatbelt at the time of manufacture, one of the following methods must be used to determine compliance with an approved standard:

a) a statement of compliance supplied by the vehicle manufacturer, which lists an approved seatbelt anchorage standard, or

b) if the vehicle is class MA, if it is listed in Table 4 of MoT St. 31391 (see Reference material 41), or

c) type-testing.

If evidence of compliance with an approved standard cannot be provided, the vehicle inspector must fail the vehicle.

In such cases, the vehicle owner may choose to:

  • undergo low volume vehicle (LVV) certification of the seatbelt anchorages, or
  • remove the seatbelts and seating.

21 Rear seatbelts as aisle obstructions in passenger service vehicles

23 Used imported motorsport vehicles

Situation

Under Land Transport Rule: Frontal Impact Amendment 2008 and Land Transport Rule: Exhaust Emissions 2007, a vehicle that is of class MA or MC is not required to comply with an approved frontal impact standard or exhaust emissions standard if it is recognised as a dedicated motorsport vehicle.

The Transport Agency and MotorSport New Zealand (MSNZ) have agreed on a process to allow a limited number of genuine dedicated motorsport vehicles to be imported and certified for use on New Zealand roads. These vehicles may participate in MSNZ-sanctioned events that have road stages requiring the vehicle to have a current WoF and registration. Such vehicles may be driven on the road to get to and from MSNZ events, and for servicing and certification. They are not for ‘daily driver’ use.

Application

This document applies to any used or parallel-imported vehicle dedicated to motorsport use that is undergoing entry certification in New Zealand, which:

  • is a class MA or MC vehicle that does not meet an approved frontal impact and/or exhaust emissions standard, or
  • is a left-hand drive vehicle that does not meet the requirements for importing a Category A left-hand drive vehicle, or
  • was used for motorsport purposes in the country of origin, but was never registered there for use on the road, or
  • is a new, purpose-built vehicle that has not been registered in the country of origin.

The NZTA acknowledges that the types of vehicle specified above will not meet some of the current vehicle standards and entry requirements.

People importing vehicles that fall into the above categories must be referred in the first instance to:

Technical Manager – MotorSport NZ
Phone 04 815 8015
Fax 04 472 9011
PO Box 3793

Wellington 6140

Email technical@motorsport.org.nz

Inspection

Flow diagram Figure 23-1-1 explains the procedure for processing an imported motorsport vehicle for entry certification.

Process A

Some imported motorsport vehicles may have been used but not previously registered. These vehicles will not meet the definition of a used import, but must be entered in LANDATA as used (>U<). The vehicle attributes for such vehicles should be recorded in LANDATA as follows:

In the field …

Type …

Vehicle type

07

1st Reg date

The year the vehicle will be first registered in New Zealand

Prev cntry

XXX

Orig cntry

The code for the country where the vehicle was built

VIN screen

Figure 23-1-2. Sample VIN screen

Notes must be entered against the vehicle record in LANDATA explaining the motorsport vehicle exemption category. For example, ‘MotorSport vehicle manufactured in 1999 used but never registered’.

Process B

Step 1 – Documentation

Dedicated motorsport vehicles must still meet all the relevant standards applicable to the vehicle (according to age, etc).

The VIRM: Entry certification manual details the standards a vehicle and its components are required to meet. See Inspection and certification Table 1-1-2 for methods to demonstrate compliance with required standards.

Where compliance with an approved standard can not be proven by these methods, the following methods are acceptable alternatives:

a) visual confirmation and recording of standards for items such as lighting, glazing, tyres and so on

b) low volume vehicle (LVV) certification for modified components, such as brakes, steering and suspension, not covered on the MotorSport NZ authority card

c) a MotorSport NZ authority card that includes at least frontal impact assessment

Left-hand drive vehicles

Left-hand drive motorsport vehicles must meet all the requirements described in Pre-registration and VIN 6, Left-hand drive vehicles. If an exemption has been issued, the code ‘C5 (Left hand drive motorsport)’ must be entered in the ‘Special permit’ field on the VIN screen.

MotorSport authority card

If a MotorSport NZ authority card is issued for a vehicle, the code LVAC (low volume authority card) must be entered in the IVCERT screen. The Certifier ID to be recorded for a motorsport authority card is >TMWM1<.

Record the modifications listed on the authority card in the comments field.

Step 2 – Compliance inspection

Motorsport vehicles must be inspected according to the requirements outlined in the VIRM: Entry certification.

If a vehicle has been modified, it must have LVV certification and/or a motorsport authority card (Figure 23-1-3).

If there is evidence of previous structural repairs or structural damage to a motorsport vehicle, it must be referred to a repair certifier for inspection and certification.

Step 3 – MR2A completion and vehicle registration

1. Any original exemption letters must be sighted, copied and returned to the vehicle owner.

2. Notes must be recorded against the vehicle record in LANDATA.

a) If the vehicle is recognised as a dedicated motorpsort vehicle that does not meet a frontal impact and/or exhaust emissions standard, the following note must be recorded in the LANDATA notes screen:

‘Vehicle must remain registered in the name of >vehicle owner< or motorsport vehicle recognition is void’.

The importer’s name must match the name shown on the exemption letter.
If the vehicle does not meet a frontal impact standard, the FIS (frontal impact standard) field must be set to >N<.

b) Update LANDATA with Special Permit Code MS.

c) If the vehicle has been issued a left-hand drive exemption letter, the following note must be recorded in the LANDATA notes screen:

‘Vehicle must remain registered in the name of the>vehicle owner< or left-hand drive exemption is void’.

3. The MR2A must be completed and printed in the name of the vehicle importer. This must be the same as the name shown on any exemption letter.

4. The vehicle must be registered in the name of the vehicle importer before a warrant of fitness can be issued.

Note 1

If a vehicle is recognised as a motorsport vehicle exempt from frontal impact or exhaust emissions standard requirements, the MR2A must not leave the control of the entry certifier until after the vehicle is registered to ensure it is registered in the importer’s name.

Note 2

All exemptions will be issued to individuals. If a company or organisation has applied for a motorsport exemption, it will be issued to a nominated individual.

If an entry certifier wishes to deviate from these instructions, written approval from the Transport Agency must be obtained.

Assistance

Contact your technical manager if you have any questions.

Figure 23-1-3. Sample motorsport authority card (front and rear)

motosport flowdiagram

Figure 23-1-1. Procedure for processing an imported motorsport vehicle for entry certification

24 Recording the number of seats for self-propelled motorhomes

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to self-propelled motorhome vehicles undergoing entry certification in New Zealand.

Requirements

When recording the number of seats in a self-propelled motorhome, the vehicle inspector must take the following factors into account:

  • the number of seats recorded on the importation documents (eg the de-registration or export certificate), and
  • the number of seats fitted by the vehicle manufacturer, and
  • the date of manufacture or conversion to a motorhome.
Vehicles manufactured or converted to a motorhome before 1 October 2003

The inspector should only count the fixed seats originally fitted by the vehicle manufacturer, not additional seats constructed by folding up or repositioning squabs, tables or beds.

The number of seats recorded in LANDATA should not exceed the number of seats recorded on the importation documents.

The vehicle must be fitted with seatbelts appropriate for the class of vehicle it was recorded as when first registered as a motorhome.

Examples

1. A motorhome manufactured in 2001 is imported. Two seats are indicated on the de-registration certificate. There are six seating positions in the vehicle but four of these seating positions fold down into beds. The vehicle should be recorded in LANDATA as a two-seater.

2. A vehicle is imported with eight seats indicated on the de-registration certificate. There are three factory seats in the front, with two seats in the rear that fold down into beds. The vehicle should be recorded in LANDATA as a three-seater.

Vehicles manufactured or converted to a motorhome after 1 October 2003

The number of seating positions recorded in LANDATA should match the number of sleeping berths.

The vehicle must be fitted with:

a) seatbelts in front seating positions as specified for class MB vehicles in the VIRM: In-service certification Table 7-5-3 (column three).

b) seatbelts in rear seating positions as specified for class MB vehicles in the VIRM: In-service certification Table 7-5-3 (column three) for at least as many rear seating positions as the number of sleeping berths minus the number of front seating positions.

c) a notice displayed in a prominent location, which recommends on safety grounds that passengers use the seats that are fitted with seatbelts when the vehicle is travelling, and stating that it is compulsory to wear fitted seatbelts.

Example

1. A motorhome manufactured in 2004 is imported. The vehicle has five sleeping berths. There are two front seating positions. There must be at least three rear seating positions fitted with lap or lap-and-diagonal seatbelts. The vehicle should be recorded in LANDATA as a five-seater.

2. A motorhome manufactured in 2004 is imported. The vehicle has two sleeping berths. There are two front seating positions and there is a two-seat sofa in the rear. There is no requirement to have any of the rear seating positions fitted with belts. The vehicle should be recorded in LANDATA as a two-seater.

Page amended 1 March and 11 March 2016 (see amendment details).

25 Immigrants' vehicles


Situation

Under Land Transport Rule: Frontal Impact Amendment 2008 and Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Exhaust Emissions Amendment 2007, a vehicle is not required to comply with an approved frontal impact standard or exhaust emissions standard if it is recognised as an immigrant’s vehicle.

The following standards marking will be sufficient to determine that an immigrants’ vehicle may not comply with the necessary standards and can therefore be processed under immigrant’s vehicle criteria.

Emissions
  • A whole vehicle approval plate with the framework approval number 98/14 or earlier for both petrol and diesel powered vehicles
  • An ADR plate with the approval date of 12/2005 or earlier for petrol, LPG or CNG powered vehicles
  • An ADR plate with the approval date of 12/2006 or earlier for diesel powered vehicles
  • An EPA label with the model year of 2000 or earlier for petrol, LPG or CNG powered vehicles
  • An EPA label with the model year of 2003 or earlier for diesel powered vehicles.
Frontal impact
  • A whole vehicle approval plate with the approval number 98/14 or earlier
  • An ADR plate with the approval date of 12/1995 or earlier.
Electronic stability control (ESC)

ESC provisions do not apply to immigrants' vehicles.

Application

This document applies to any used vehicle that is undergoing entry certification in New Zealand, which:

  • has been identified in writing by a Transport Agency entry certification agent as an immigrant’s vehicle appropriate for certification to enter service in New Zealand, and
  • is imported to New Zealand by an immigrant entitled to take up permanent residence in New Zealand, or
  • is imported by a New Zealand citizen or resident returning to New Zealand after at least 21 months overseas.
Obtaining recognition of an immigrant’s vehicle

To be eligible to register an immigrant’s vehicle, an applicant must:

1. apply to an organisation appointed by the Transport Agency (such as a Transport Agency entry certification agent), before the vehicle is certified for entry into service in New Zealand (an application form is available in Reference material 50), and

2. pay the appropriate fees (if any) specified in accordance with regulations made under the Act.

Recognition of an immigrant’s vehicle may be granted if:

  • the applicant is a New Zealand citizen, or a New Zealand resident, or entitled to take up permanent residence in New Zealand under the Immigration Act 1987 (Note 1), and
  • the applicant has lived outside New Zealand for at least 21 months continuously before arriving in or returning to New Zealand (Note 3), and
  • the application is made:

a) within 18 months of the applicant’s arrival in or return to New Zealand, or

b) for a vehicle border checked between 1 April 2002 and 8 May 2008, and

c) the applicant has signed a declaration in accordance with the immigrant’s vehicle criteria.

Note 1

Document authorising residence in New Zealand means any of the following:

  • a current New Zealand passport
  • a current Australian passport
  • a current New Zealand residence visa or permit, or a current New Zealand returning resident’s visa or permit
  • a current permanent residence visa (including a resident return visa) issued by the Government of the  Commonwealth  of Australia
  • a NZ Customs service ‘Deed of Undertaking’ (see Reference material 66).
Immigrant’s vehicle declaration criteria

An applicant for recognition of an immigrant’s vehicle must sign a declaration, declaring that:

a) the applicant has resided outside New Zealand for a period of not less than 21 months before the applicant’s arrival in or return to New Zealand and

b) the applicant has personally owned the vehicle, and has registered for personal use in a country outside New Zealand for a period of at least one year before their arrival in or return to New Zealand, and

c) the applicant has not had any other vehicle recognised as an immigrant’s vehicle, and

d) the applicant has not imported the vehicle on behalf of, or for, a third party, and

e) the applicant will not sell or lease the vehicle to a third party for at least one year after the date that the vehicle is first registered in New Zealand, and

f) the vehicle will not be operated in a transport service for at least one year after the date that the vehicle is first registered in New Zealand.

Conditions of use

A vehicle that is recognised as an immigrant’s vehicle must:

a) be registered in New Zealand in the applicant’s name for at least one year after the date on which the vehicle is first registered in New Zealand, although additional names may also appear on the registration documents, and

b) not operate as part of a transport service.

Note 2

Those persons ‘entitled to take up permanent residence in New Zealand under the Immigration Act 1987’ includes those in New Zealand under the ‘Talent Visa’ scheme.

Note 3

Customs document (Deed of Undertaking) can be accepted as proof of a person residing outside of New Zealand for a period of not less than 21 months, before their arrival in or return to New Zealand, and as proof that they hold a document authorising residence in New Zealand (see Reference material 66).


Inspection

The following flowchart explains the procedure for processing an immigrant’s vehicle for entry certification.

procedure for processing an immigrant’s vehicle for entry certification

Step 1 – Documentation

Immigrants’ vehicles must still meet those standards applicable to the vehicle (according to age, etc).

The VIRM: Entry certification details the standards a vehicle and its components are required to meet. See Inspection & certification Table 1-1-1 for methods to demonstrate compliance with required standards.

Where compliance with an approved standard can not be proven by these methods, the following methods are acceptable alternatives:

  • visual confirmation and recording of standards for items such as lighting, glazing, tyres and so on
  • low volume vehicle (LVV) certification for modified components, such as brakes, steering and suspension
  • a letter of exemption from the Transport Agency for specific items not covered above. Application forms for exemptions can be obtained from the the Transport Agency website.
Step 2 – Compliance inspection

Immigrants’ vehicles must be inspected according to the requirements outlined in the VIRM: Entry certification.

If a vehicle has been modified, it must have LVV certification.

If there is evidence of previous structural repairs or structural damage to a vehicle, it must be referred to a repair certifier for inspection and certification.

Ensure the vehicle meets all other required standards.

Step 3 – MR2A completion and vehicle registration

1. Any original letters must be sighted, copied and returned to the vehicle owner.

2. The following note must be recorded in the LANDATA notes screen:

‘Vehicle must remain registered in the name of >vehicle owner< for at least one year from the date
of registration in New Zealand’.

The applicant’s name must match the name shown on the letter of recognition as an immigrant’s vehicle.
If the vehicle does not meet an approved frontal impact standard, the FIS (frontal impact standard) field must be set to >N<.

3. Update LANDATA with special permit code IM.

4. The MR2A must be completed and printed in the name of the person registering the vehicle. This must be the same as the name shown on any exemption letter.

5. The vehicle must be registered in the name of the person registering the vehicle before a warrant of fitness can
be issued.

6. The entry certifier must retain a copy of the immigrant's approval letter on the vehicle file.

If an entry certifier wishes to deviate from these instructions, written approval from the Transport Agency must be obtained.

Page amended 1 June 2018 (see amendment details).

26 Special interest vehicles


Situation

Under Land Transport Rule: Frontal Impact Amendment 2008 and Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Exhaust Emissions 2007, a class MA vehicle is not required to comply with an approved frontal impact standard or exhaust emissions standard if it is granted a special interest vehicle permit.

Application

This document applies to any used or parallel-imported vehicle that is undergoing entry certification in New Zealand, which has been granted a special interest vehicle permit and is appropriate for certification to enter service in New Zealand.

Obtaining special interest vehicle permits

To obtain a special interest vehicle permit, an applicant must:

1. apply to the Transport Agency before the vehicle is certified for entry into service in New Zealand; and

2. pay the appropriate fees (if any) specified in accordance with regulations made under the Act.

Note 1

All applications must have the applicant’s declarations witnessed by an entry certifier. The complete application with all the supporting evidence is then sent to the Transport Agency by the entry certifier.

A special interest vehicle permit may be issued if:
  • the Transport Agency considers that the vehicle will be owned as a collector’s item, and it:

a) is of historic value; or

b) meets three of the four qualifying criteria set out below

  • the applicant:

a) is a New Zealand citizen or resident, and

b) has another vehicle for primary use that is a class MA, MB, MC or NA vehicle registered in the applicant’s name, leased by the applicant or is a company car, and

c) has not been issued with a special interest vehicle permit in the last two years, and does not have any other special interest vehicle registered in his/her name, and

d) has submitted a complete and correct application, including a signed declaration, and

e) has paid the appropriate fees (if any) specified in accordance with regulations made under the Act.

Qualifying criteria for special interest vehicle permits

To meet qualifying criteria for a special interest vehicle permit, the applicant must provide evidence that the vehicle meets at least three of the following requirements:

1. The vehicle (or its make, model and sub-model) is identified as being a collector’s item in one of the following magazines, or its respective website (Note 2):

a) Australian Classic Car

b) Car and Driver (US)

c) Automobile (US)

d) MOTOR (Australia)

e) Motor Trend (US)

f) New Zealand Autocar

g) New Zealand Classic Car

h) Road and Track (US)

i) Top Gear (UK)

j) Top Gear NZ

k) Unique Cars (Australia)

l) Wheels (Australia).

2. The vehicle’s make and model has been (or was) manufactured in annual volumes of 20,000 units or less

3. The vehicle is, and was manufactured as:

a) a two-door coupe, or

b) a convertible

4. The vehicle is, and was manufactured as a high-performance vehicle.

Note 2

This is not intended to be an exhaustive list of magazines in which special interest vehicles feature, but a list of magazines in which any special vehicle is expected to feature.

Conditions for special interest vehicle permits

1. The NZTA may not issue more than 200 special interest vehicle permits in any calendar year.

2. A special interest vehicle permit ceases to be valid if the vehicle is not inspected at the border or certified for entry within six months of the date of issue.

Note 3

A special interest vehicle permit that ceases to be valid in the calendar year it was issued will not be counted as part of the quota of 200 per annum.


Inspection

The following flowchart explains the procedure for processing a special interest vehicle for entry certification.

SIV flowchart

Step 1 – Documentation

Special interest vehicles must still meet those standards applicable to the vehicle (according to age, etc).

The VIRM: Entry certification details the standards a vehicle and its components are required to meet. See Inspection & certification Table 1-1-3 (Inspection & certification section 1-1) for methods to demonstrate compliance with required standards.

Where compliance with an approved standard can not be proven by these methods, the following methods are acceptable alternatives:

  • visual confirmation and recording of standards for items such as lighting, glazing, tyres and so on.
  • low volume vehicle (LVV) certification for modified components, such as brakes, steering and suspension.
  • a letter of exemption from the NZTA for specific items not covered above. Application forms for exemptions can be obtained from the NZTA website.
Step 2 – Submit to the Transport Agency for processing

The application and documentation for a special interest vehicle permit must be submitted to:

Vehicle Compliance Specialist
Customer Access
NZ Transport Agency
Private Bag 6995
Wellington 6141

A letter advising of the result (approve or decline) will be sent to the entry certifier for forwarding to the applicant.

Step 3 – Compliance inspection

Special interest vehicles must be inspected according to the requirements outlined in the VIRM: Entry certification.

If a vehicle has been modified, it must have LVV certification.

If there is evidence of previous structural repairs or structural damage to a vehicle, it must be referred to a repair certifier for inspection and certification.

Step 4 – MR2A completion and vehicle registration

1. Any original letters must be sighted, copied and returned to the vehicle owner.

2. If the vehicle has been issued a special interest vehicle permit and does not meet an approved frontal impact standard and/or exhaust emissions standard, the following note must be recorded in the LANDATA notes screen:

‘Vehicle must remain registered in the name of >vehicle owner< for at least four years from
the date of first registration in New Zealand’.

The owner’s name must match the name shown on the permit.
If the vehicle does not meet an approved frontal impact standard, the FIS (frontal impact standard) field must be set to >N<.

3. Update LANDATA with special permit code SP.

4. The MR2A must be completed and printed in the name of the person registering the vehicle. This must be the same as the name shown on any exemption letter.

5. The vehicle must be registered in the name of the person registering the vehicle before a warrant of fitness can be issued.

If an entry certifier wishes to deviate from these instructions, written approval from the Transport Agency must be obtained.

27 Alternative proof of compliance – Singapore/Japan

Vehicles previously registered in Singapore

Introduction

This procedure may be used as an alternative to obtaining a statement of compliance for some used vehicles from Singapore.

It is divided into two processes, one for used Japanese domestic vehicles with a type designation number (TDN) and the other for non-Japanese domestic vehicles. Both types of vehicle must have been previously registered in Singapore.

Approved certifier procedures

1. Send the Singapore Land Transport Authority (LTA) technical information of motor vehicle letter to your Technical Manager – and advise the vehicle owner that he/she will be notified of the outcome in due course.

2. Your Technical Manager will issue a letter advising either:

a) that a statement of compliance will be required, or

b) approval of the Singapore LTA letter as acceptable evidence of compliance at the time of manufacture (conditions may apply).

3. If the application is successful, attach the approval letter to the vehicle file.

Vehicles from Japan without a TDN

Introduction

This procedure provides an alternative to obtaining a statement of compliance for a vehicle from Japan that does not have a TDN on its export certificate. This is only applicable to vehicles manufactured outside Japan as vehicles manufactured in Japan for the Japanese market are not required by the NZTA to have a TDN on the export certificate.

These vehicles must have been previously registered in Japan.

Approved certifier procedures

1. Send the export certificate to your Technical Manager – and advise the vehicle owner that he/she will be notified of the outcome in due course.

2. Your Technical Manager will issue a letter advising either:

a) that a statement of compliance will be required, or

b) the vehicle may be accepted as compliant at the time of manufacture.

3. If the application is successful, attach the approval letter to the vehicle file.

28 Exhaust emissions standard compliance


Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

Under Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Exhaust Emissions 2007, when a vehicle undergoes entry-level certification in New Zealand, proof that the vehicle was manufactured to meet an approved emissions standard is required.

This technical bulletin applies to all vehicles being certified for entry into New Zealand that are required to meet approved exhaust emissions standards.

Definition of Euro 4

Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Exhaust Emissions 2007 defines Euro 4 as follows:
Euro 4
(a) means:

  1. UN/ECE Regulation No. 83, uniform provisions concerning the approval of vehicles with regard to the emission of pollutants according to engine fuel requirements (E/ECE/324E/ECE/TRANS/505/Rev.1/Add.82/Rev.2) incorporating the 05 series of amendments, as per the limit values in row B of the table to clause 5.3.1.4; or
  2. Council Directive 70/220/EEC as amended by Council Directive 98/69/EC as per the limit values in row B of the table to clause 5.3.1.4 of Annex I of 98/69/EC…

This definition does not necessarily require the vehicle to be formally certified as Euro 4. The two elements required to meet this definition are:

  1. The vehicle must be certified to UN/ECE Regulation 83.05 or EC Directive 70/220/EEC as amended by 98/69/EC (or a later amendment), and
  2. The declared emissions values on that certification must be within the specified limits set out in Row B of the quoted table (the Euro 4 emissions limits)
Clarification

In practice, it is possible for a vehicle to be formally certified in Europe as a Euro 3 vehicle, but for it to comply with the Row B emissions limits required for Euro 4. Such vehicles are certified to UN/ECE Regulation 83.05 or 98/69/EC, or later amendment, (which contain both Euro 3 and Euro 4 requirements)
In cases like this, despite being formally certified as Euro 3, the vehicle meets the Emissions Rule definition as a Euro 4 vehicle and can be accepted as such.

Acceptable proof of exhaust emissions rule compliance for used vehicles from any country
  • For a used vehicle imported from any country, a statement of compliance including an approved emissions standard is acceptable evidence of compliance. The emissions standard provided in the statement of compliance must be recorded on the vehicle checksheet.
  • A Statement of Compliance containing one of the the following statements is also acceptable:
    “This vehicle has been certified to UN/ECE Regulation 83.05 and complies with the limit values specified in Row B of the table to clause 5.3.1.4”, or

    “This vehicle has been certified to 70/220/EC as amended by 98/69/EC [or later amendment if applicable] and complies with the limit values specified in Row B of the table to clause 5.3.1.4 of Annex 1”
  • A Statement of Compliance with a quoted emissions standard of UN/ECE Regulation 83.05 or 98/69/EC [or later amendment], and containing a set of certified emissions values that fall below the limits set out in Table 28-1-1 (as applicable to petrol or diesel models).
  • An emission certificate produced by TÜV SÜD or DEKRA that confirms that the vehicle is compliant with Euro 4 emissions standards. Each individual vehicle will be issued with an approved Exhaust Emissions Compliant Certificate. TÜV SÜD certificates can be issued by SOC NZ (until February 2017 Autohub issued the certificates) and DEKRA certificates can be issued by VTNZ. For a TÜV SÜD sample certificate see Reference Material 73c; for a DEKRA sample Certificate, see Reference Material 73b.

    SOC NZ Limited can supply TÜV SÜD full statements of compliance and emission certificates by visiting the SOC NZ Limited website or emailing: karen@socnz.co.nz or joe@socnz.co.nz.

    VTNZ certificates (DEKRA) can be ordered by contacting Paul Deans or David Thomson at technical@vtnz.co.nz.

    * the certifier must keep the original of this certificate on the vehicle file.

    An emailed copy of a TÜV SÜD or DEKRA certificate can be accepted providing they are emailed directly to a KSDP email address.

Statements of compliance from Motor Industry Association manufacturers’ representatives

Statements of compliance from the Motor Industry Association of New Zealand (MIA) manufacturers’ representatives can use an abbreviated format to refer to emissions standards. In particular, this involves using the terms ‘Euro 3’ and ‘Euro 4’ and so on, instead of quoting the relevant UN/ECE regulation or EC directive in full, subject to the following conditions:

a) This terminology is to be used only on statements of compliance issued by the MIA representatives of the vehicle manufacturers.

b) By using the abbreviated term, the person signing the statement of compliance is certifying that the vehicle has been formally homologated to the UN/ECE regulation or EC Directive for exhaust emissions that is appropriate to the vehicle type.

c) The issuer of the statement of compliance must be able to provide, on request, the relevant certification documentation as set out in declaration 2 of the standard statement of compliance.

Acceptable proof of exhaust emissions rule compliance for used vehicles from Japan

a) For vehicles border checked for entry into New Zealand before 1 February 2008, an original Japanese de-registration, export or completion inspection certificate with an emissions code as a prefix (ie before a hyphen) at the beginning of the industry model code (see circled area on Figure 28-1-1).

b) For vehicles border checked for entry into New Zealand on or after 1 February 2008, an original de-registration, export or completion inspection certificate with an acceptable emissions code listed in Table 1 or Table 2. This code is known as as a prefix (ie before a hyphen) at the beginning of the industry model code (see circled area on Figure 28-1-1).

c) Proof of compliance letters issued by VTNZ can be accepted as proof of emissions compliance (see Reference material 81).

Note For used vehicles imported from Japan that require fuel consumption information, exhaust emissions data will be printed in the test regime field of the fuel consumption statement.

The VIA (formerly IMVIA) ceased issuing exhaust emission compliance certificates from 28 December 2018. Should any VIA emission certificates be presented with issue dates later than 28 December 2018 or for vehicles that may have been imported after that date, please contact the Transport Agency (vehicles@nzta.govt.nz) before accepting them. See Reference material 77 for a sample of the certificate.
Recording the information

This emissions code information must be recorded on the vehicle checksheet and entered into LANDATA.

Enter the full industry model code from the de-registration, export or completion inspection certificate, including the emissions code characters, into the ‘industry model code’ field.

  • If the industry model code is prefixed by an emissions code, the ‘test regime code’ to be recorded in LANDATA is determined by adding a ‘J’ to the beginning of the emissions code prefix (eg the emissions code prefix CBA is recorded as test regime code JCBA). If a fuel consumption statement shows a different test regime code, record the code from the fuel consumption statement.
  • If the industry model code recorded on the de-registration, export or completion inspection certificate does not include an emissions prefix, other evidence of compliance with an approved exhaust emissions standard, such as a statement of compliance or appropriate compliance plates, must be provided. For these vehicles, refer to Table 3 below to find the applicable ‘test regime code’ to be entered in LANDATA.
Acceptable proof of exhaust emissions rule compliance for used vehicles imported from Singapore

Standards compliance for vehicles imported from Singapore can be demonstrated using the following documents:

a) a Singapore de-registration certificate, and

b) an outcome notification letter from an entry certifier head office advising that the Singapore LTA technical letter is acceptable documentation, and

either

c) if the vehicle is a used Japanese domestic vehicle , a Singapore Land Transport Authority (LTA) technical letter listing an approved Japanese emissions code as shown in Table 1 or Table 2 below, or

d) A Singapore Land Transport Authority (LTA) technical letter listing UN/ECE Regulation 83.05 or 98/69/EC [or later amendment] as the emissions test method , and containing a set of quoted emissions values that fall below the limits set out in Table 28-1-1, as applicable to the vehicle’s gross vehicle mass. If “96/69/EC” is listed as the emissions test method, the quoted emissions values cannot be used and additional evidence of emissions standards compliance must be provided .

Note: Diesel vehicles registered in Singapore on or after 1 October 2006 will meet the Euro 4 exhaust emission standard.

Note: As of 1 January 2017, the Singapore emissions exemptions document, a Transport Agency list of exemption-eligible vehicles, ceased to be valid. The above advice replaces the previous exemptions procedure.

Acceptable proof of exhaust emissions rule compliance for new or used light vehicles with ADR plates showing approval for  Australia

Which version of ADR 79 that a vehicle complies with can be determined using the date on the ADR compliance plate as follows:

Date on ADR plate

Petrol

Diesel

01/2007–06/2010

Not proven to be compliant

ADR 79/01 (Euro 4)

07/2010 onwards

ADR 79/02 (Euro 4)

ADR 79/01 (Euro 4)

  • If there is no emissions standard on the plate, the compliance plate approval number must be recorded on the vehicle checksheet.
  • Some vehicles may comply up to a year in advance of these dates (and up to two years in the case of petrol vehicles complying with ADR 79/02). To confirm compliance in these cases, contact the vehicle manufacturer.
  • Diesel vehicles must also comply with ADR 30. If a diesel vehicle has an ADR compliance plate and can be established as complying with the appropriate ADR 79, it also complies with ADR 30 .
  • From August 2009 production, all non-turbo I6 engines fitted to Ford Territory MkII will comply with Euro 4 emissions certifications standards.
  • An alternative way to verify ADR 79/02 compliance is by checking the RVCS website. If both ADR 79/02 and ADR 79/01 are shown, the exact amendment date when ADR 79/02 compliance was gained should be noted and then it should be verified that the vehicle in question was manufactured after that date. This should be verified by the technical manager and a printout should be kept with the vehicle file.
    • For example, a vehicle with ADR approval #36815 was originally complied to ADR 79/01 on 18-May-2007. It was then complied to ADR 79/02 on 20-April-2009. Only a vehicle with an ADR approval plate showing a date of manufacture after April-2009 is compliant with ADR 79/02.
Acceptable proof of exhaust emissions rule compliance for new or used heavy vehicles with ADR plates showing approval for Australia

Which version of ADR 80 that a vehicle complies with can be determined using the date on the ADR compliance plate as follows:

Date on ADR plate

Petrol

Diesel

01/2008 – 12/2010

ADR 80/02

ADR 80/02

01/2011 onwards

ADR 80/03

ADR 80/03

  • If there is no emissions standard on the plate, the compliance plate approval number must be recorded on the vehicle checksheet.
  • Some new model vehicles may comply up to a year in advance. Check with the vehicle manufacturer to confirm compliance when certifying new model vehicles.
  • Diesel vehicles must also comply with ADR 30. If a diesel vehicle has an ADR compliance plate and can be established as complying with the appropriate ADR 80, it also complies with ADR 30.
Acceptable proof of exhaust emissions rule compliance for vehicles from Europe

1. If the vehicle is border checked for entry into New Zealand before 1 February 2008:

a) an EEC whole vehicle approval plate. The EEC whole vehicle approval number must be recorded on the vehicle checksheet, or

b) a UN/ECE compliance plate listing an approved emissions standard. The emissions standard identified on the plate must be recorded on the vehicle checksheet.

2. If the vehicle is border checked for entry into New Zealand on or after 1 February 2008:

a) a statement of compliance listing an approved emissions standard, or an appropriate EC directive as shown in Table A or UN/ECE regulation as shown in Table B, or

b) a UN/ECE compliance plate listing an approved emissions standard or one of the UN/ECE regulations shown in Table B, or

c) an EC Certificate of Conformity (CoC) issued by the vehicle manufacturer for individual light vehicles that have undergone European Commission Whole Vehicle Type Approval (EC WVTA). The CoC is linked to the EC Whole Vehicle Approval Plate – if a vehicle has a CoC, it will also have a Whole Vehicle Approval Plate. A sample CoC is shown in Reference material 49. The emissions standard information is recorded in item 46.1 or 48 of the CoC, or

d) An EC whole vehicle approval plate. Refer to Reference material 29, Note 2.

e) An EC Certificate of Conformity showing an EC Whole Vehicle Approval number of 2001/116 or later, and with all emissions values (quoted in section 48) falling below the limit values set out in Table 28-1-1.

Acceptable proof of exhaust emissions rule compliance for vehicles from the United Kingdom
  • Any vehicle first registered as new in the UK from 1 October 2007 onwards will be certified to the Euro 4 emission requirements and might meet a higher standard.
  • Any light vehicle ex-UK that is presented for entry certification, that has a valid Certificate of permanent export, V5C, V308 or VX302 registration certificate (see Reference material 59, 67 and 68) showing that it was first registered as new in the UK on or after 1 October 2007 may be accepted as complying with the Euro 4 emissions standard and might meet a higher standard.
  • If the emission code EURO4, EURO5 or higher is listed on a valid Certificate of permanent export, V5C, V308 or VX302 registration document of a vehicle first registered as new in the UK, it may be accepted as proof of emissions compliance.
  • Light vehicles that were first registered as new in the UK before 1 October 2007 may still be Euro 4 compliant, but will require further proof of their emission compliance. Contact your Technical Manager for advice on the process to be followed.
  • A UK V5 document showing an EC Whole Vehicle Approval number of 2001/116 or later, and with all emissions values (quoted in section V) falling below the limit values set out in Table 28-1-1.
  • Proof of emission compliance for vehicles from the UK can also be found at: http://carfueldata.direct.gov.uk/. Information from this website can provide the emission limits for vehicles that must fall below the limit values set out in Table 28-1-1.
Table A. Translation information for EC Directives

EC Directive

Corresponds to Euro standard ...

Light vehicles

98/69B/EC

Euro 4

98/77B/EC

1999/102B/EC

2001/1B

2001/100B/EC

2002/80B/EC

2003/76B/EC

2005/21/EC

2006/96B/EC

715/2007A/EC to 715/2007M/EC

Euro 5

692/2008/EC

692/2008A/EC

595/2009

715/2007N/EC to 715/2007V/EC

Euro 6

Heavy vehicles

1999/96B/EC

Euro IV

2001/27B/EC

2005/55

2005/55D/EC to 2005/55G/EC

2008/74/EC

Euro V

595/2009

Euro VI

Decoding EC emissions system approval numbers

An EC emissions system approval number will be in the following format:

e4*70/220*2003/76B*1234*01

The different parts of an approval number can be decoded as follows:

e4 The lower case ‘e’ indicates compliance with an EC directive, and the number (‘4’ in this case, but it will vary) denotes the country in which the approval was issued
70/220 The number 70/220 signifies the base EC Emissions Directive and indicates that the approval is for exhaust emissions. This number will be present in all EC emissions approval numbers
2003/76B This number indicates the version of the EC emissions directive to which the vehicle complies. Reference this number against the above table to determine the emissions level. The ‘/EC’ or ‘/EEC’ suffixes used in the table will not appear in the EC approval number
1234 This is the model-specific approval number. It is not important for determining emissions level and will vary
01 This is the number of the extension to the emissions approval. It is not important for determining emissions level and will vary
Table B. Translation information for UN/ECE regulations

UN/ECE regulation

Corresponds to Euro standard ...

Light vehicles

UN/ECE regulation 83.05 Indeterminate – the default emissions level is Euro 3 unless otherwise indicated on the compliance documentation

UN/ECE regulation 83.05B or stage 2

Euro 4

UN/ECE regulation 83.06 Euro 5 (eg E11 - 85R - 062439 - J)

Heavy vehicles

UN/ECE regulation 49.05

Row B1 (as indicated by character B or C) = Euro 4 (eg  E11 - 49RC – 052439, or 49.05C)

Row B2 or C (as indicated by character D or higher) = Euro 5 (eg E11 – 49RD – 052439, or 49.05D)

Interpretation of various light duty emissions numbers

Example of Emissions type approval number

Interpretation of Euro emissions level

e2*70/220/EEC*2003/76/EC (B)

70/220 followed by letter “B” signifies Euro 4 compliance

70/220*2006/96B

70/220 followed by letter “B” signifies Euro 4 compliance

e4*715/2007*692/2008A*0001*00

715/2007 followed by “A” signifies Euro 5a compliance

e1*715/2007*595/2009C*0004*02

715/2007 followed by “C” signifies Euro 5a compliance

ECE83 as last amended by 05 stage 2

(UN)ECE 83.05 stage 2 signifies Euro 4 compliance

(UN)ECE83.05 B

(UN)ECE 83.05 B approval signifies Euro 4 compliance

Decoding UN/ECE emissions system approval numbers

A UN/ECE emissions system approval number will be in one of the following formats:

Format 1:

E13*83R00*83R05*1234*01

This format is more likely to be used on statements of compliance.

The different parts of an approval number can be decoded as follows:

E4 The Upper case ‘E’ indicates compliance with an EC directive, and the number (‘4’ in this case, but it will vary) denotes the country in which the approval was issued
83R00 The number 83R00 signifies the original UN/ECE Emissions Regulation and indicates that the approval is for exhaust emissions. This number will be present in all UN/ECE emissions approval numbers
83R05 This number indicates the version of the EC emissions directive to which the vehicle complies. Reference this number against the above table to determine the emissions level. In this case, ‘83R05’ indicates that the vehicle complies with UN/ECE Regulation 83.05, with ‘83R04’ denoting Regulation 83.04 and so on
1234 This is the model-specific approval number. It is not important for determining emissions level and will vary
01 This is the number of the extension to the emissions approval. It is not important for determining emissions level and will vary
Format 2:

E11 83RI – 052439

This format is more likely to be used on UN/ECE compliance plates.

The different parts of the approval number can be decoded as follows:

E11

The Upper case ‘E’ indicates compliance with an EC directive, and the number (‘11’ in this case, but it will vary) denotes the country in which the approval was issued

83RI The number 83 preceding the ‘R’ shows that the vehicle complies with UN/ECE regulation 83 for emissions. The roman numerals (I or II) after the ‘R’ may not be present but can, in combination with the first two digits of the following number, describe the emissions level (see below)
05

The first two digits of the next section indicate the amendment of UN/ECE R83 that the vehicle complies with (ie If it is ‘04’ the vehicle complies with UN/ECE Regulation 83.04)

Special case for light vehicles: If this number is ‘05’ and the numeral immediately following the ‘R’ is ‘I’, the vehicle complies with Euro 3 limits. If the numeral immediately following the ‘R’ is ‘II’, the vehicle complies with Euro 4 limits.

Special case for heavy vehicles: If this number is ‘03’ or ‘04’ and the numeral immediately following the ‘R’ is ‘I’, the vehicle complies with Euro 3 limits. If the numeral immediately following the ‘R’ is ‘II’ or ‘III’, the vehicle complies with Euro 4 limits.

2439 The last 4 digits make up the model-specific approval number
Acceptable proof of exhaust emissions compliance for used vehicles imported from the United States

1. If the vehicle is border checked for entry into New Zealand before 1 February 2008, a FMVSS plate with either:

a) an EPA plate (see Reference material 35); or

b) proof that the vehicle was first registered in the United States or was built for the United States market (indicating the vehicle would have been built to United States vehicle emissions requirements).

This is because a FMVSS and CMVSS plate does not actually refer to a vehicle emissions standard.

If the vehicle has an EPA plate, then the emissions standard identified on the EPA plate must be recorded on the vehicle checksheet; otherwise ‘FMVSS’ or 'CMVSS' and the date of the FMVSS or CMVSS plate must be recorded on the vehicle checksheet.

2. If the vehicle is border checked for entry into New Zealand on or after 1 February 2008, an FMVSS or CMVSS plate and an EPA decal (see Reference material 35) showing model year the same as or later than the year for which the vehicle must meet an emissions standard.

The EPA decal will contain a statement ‘This vehicle conforms to US EPA regulations applicable to YYYY model year.’ The ‘YYYY’ must be the same as or later than a standard shown in VIRM: Entry certification section 11-2 as acceptable for certification in New Zealand.

For example, a decal showing model year 2005 would be acceptable for a light petrol vehicle. This would be entered in LANDATA as meeting US2004.

  • Note Statements of compliance for US vehicles often refer to emissions standards using the terminology ‘EPA Federal Tier 1’ or ‘EPA Federal Tier 2’ or similar. The terminology used in Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Exhaust Emissions 2007 for US standards ( ‘US2004’ etc) is not used by the vehicle industry. Table C can be used to translate.
Table C. Translation information for US standards

Terminology

Refers to US standards ...

US Federal/EPA Tier 1

US 96

US 98D/98P

US Federal/EPA Tier 2

US 2001

US 2004

Proof of exhaust emissions rule compliance for new vehicles
  • For new light vehicles, the documentation must include proof that the vehicle was manufactured in compliance with an applicable emissions standard.
  • For scratch built low-volume vehicles and light vehicles that have had their engine changed, that is either:
    • scratch built in New Zealand on or after 1/05/2008, or
    • scratch built outside New Zealand on or after 1/01/1990 and first registered in New Zealand on or after 1/05/2008, or
    • a light vehicle that has undergone an engine conversion on or after 1/05/2008, and
    • is presented to you for entry certification, will need to be certified to this new standard (Note 1).
Determining if a vehicle is certified to this new standard

The low volume certifier will issue a F001 (LVV Statement of Compliance Certificate). This form will list the standards that the vehicle has been certified to and will include exhaust gas emissions 90–10. At this point in time there will be no information on the LVV plate (Note 3).

  • For other low-volume vehicles – including scratch-built light vehicles – any requirements provided in the Low Volume Vehicle Code must be met. The vehicle must have a low-volume vehicle plate that lists the engine and/or exhaust system in the modifications listed.
  • For new heavy vehicles, evidence of compliance (eg a statement of compliance or compliance plate) must include proof that the vehicle was manufactured in compliance with an approved emissions standard.

Some manufacturers are directly notifying the NZTA of the emission standards for the models of heavy vehicles that they are importing into New Zealand. Therefore, if a new heavy vehicle is presented for certification and the emissions code (test regime) fields in LANDATA are already populated, additional documentation proving compliance with an approved emissions standard is not needed.

  • To help confirm emissions standards compliance for new heavy vehicles imported by the manufacturer’s New Zealand representative, refer to Reference material 43.
  • For scratch-built heavy vehicles, evidence must include proof that the vehicle was built in compliance with an approved emissions standard.
Note 1

Does not apply to vehicles of class AB, LA, LB, LC, LD, LE or a low-volume vehicle powered by a two-stroke engine.

Note 2

For details of the emissions standards requirements, see Table 11-2-4 Approved exhaust emission standards for new petrol, CNG and LPG powered vehicles and Table 11-2-5 Approved exhaust emission standards for new diesel-powered vehicles in Inspection and certification pages 11-2-4 and 11-2-5.

Note 3

The LANDATA test regime code for a vehicle certified to the LVV emissions standard is ‘LZZZZZ’.

Action

If the vehicle does not have evidence of compliance with an approved emissions standard, the entry inspector must fail the vehicle and refer the vehicle owner to the NZTA’s Vehicles Unit (phone 0800 699 000; Private Bag 6995, Wellington 6145) for further advice.

Re-powering heavy vehicles

If a heavy vehicle complies with all standards except exhaust emissions, it may be re-powered with a compliant engine in accordance with Reference material 61. Please contact a heavy vehicle engineer (chassis) for more information.

Table 1. Acceptable exhaust emissions codes for petrol, LPG or CNG powered vehicles from Japan

Emission standard

Description

Complying to ...

Acceptable emissions codes

Japan 05

Japan Safety Regulations for Road Vehicles, Article 31 – Emission Control Device, as revised by the Ministry of Land Infrastructure and Transport Notification No. 1317 of 26 September 2003.

2005 Regulations

Any three digit emissions code

for example ‘AAA’, ‘ABA’, ‘DAA’

  • The ‘Test regime code’ to be entered in LANDATA is the emissions code shown in the Table, with a J prefix (eg ‘CBA’ is recorded as ‘JCBA’).
Table 2. Acceptable exhaust emissions codes for diesel-powered vehicles from Japan

Emission standard

Description

Complying to ...

Acceptable emissions codes

Japan 05

Japan Safety Regulations for Road Vehicles, Article 31 – Emission Control Device, as revised by the Ministry of Land Infrastructure and Transport Notification No. 1317 of 26 September 2003.

2005 Regulations

Any three digit emissions code

For example ‘AAA’, ‘ABA’, ‘DAA’

Japan 09   2009 Regulations Any three digit emissions code starting with:
L,F,M,Q or R
Japan 10   2010 Regulations Any three digit emissions code starting with:
S or T
  • The ‘Test regime code’ to be entered in LANDATA is the emissions code shown in the Table, with a J prefix (eg ‘CBA’ is recorded as ‘JCBA’).
Table 3. Test regime codes for exhaust emissions standards from 1/1/2012

Emission standard type

Description

Test regime code

Japan 05

Means Japan Safety Regulations for Road Vehicles, Article 31 – Emission Control Device, as revised by the Ministry of Land Infrastructure and Transport Notification No. 1317 of 26 September 2003

J05/07

Japan 2008   JC08
Japan 2009 means Japan Safety Regulations for Road Vehicles, Article 31 - Emission Control Device, as revised by the Ministry of Land J2009
Japan 2010   J2010

Euro IV or 4

European IV or 4

EUR4

Euro V or 5

European V or 5

EUR5

Euro VI or 6

European VI or 6

EUR6

2006/96/EEC

Adaptation of certain Directives in the field of free movement of goods, by reason of the accession of Bulgaria and Romania

E06096

2006/96A/EC

EU Directives Amendment

E06096

2006/96B/EC

EU Directives Amendment

E06096

2003/76B/EC

EU Directives Amendment

E03076

2002/80B/EC

EU Directives Amendment

E02080

2001/100B/EC

EU Directives Amendment

E01100

2001/1B/EC

EU Directives Amendment

E01001

1999/102B/EC

EU Directives Amendment

E99102

98/77B/EC

Amendment of Directive 70/220/EEC Amendment of Directive 70/220/EEC

E98077

98/69B/EC

Amendment of Directive 70/220/EEC

E98069

715/2007/EC

 

E71507

692/2008/EC

 

E69208

692/2008A/EC

 

E6928A

595/2009

 

E59509

UN/ECE 83

UN/ECE Regulations

ECE83

UN/ECE 49

UN/ECE Regulations

ECE49

UN/ECE 24

UN/ECE Regulations

ECE 24

Australian ADR 79/01

Emission Control for Light Vehicles

A79/01

Australian ADR 79/02

Emission Control for Light Vehicles

A79/02

Australian ADR 80/02

Emission Control for Heavy Vehicles

A80/02

Australian ADR 80/03

Emission Control for Heavy Vehicles

A80/03

Australian ADR 30/01

Smoke Emission Control for Diesel Vehicles

A30/01

Australian

May be specified as having been tested to a European test.
See entries for EURO I -VI

 

US2004

Federal Regulation 40
CFR Part 86, Subpart 86.1811-04, Emission standards for light-duty vehicles, light-duty trucks and medium-duty passenger vehicles; OR
CFR Part 86, Subpart 86.004-11, Emission standards for 2004 and later model year diesel heavy duty engines; OR

Title 13, California Code of Regulations in force December 2004

US2004

US2007

Federal Regulation 40, CFR Part 86, Subpart A 40 86.008-11

US2007

US2008

Federal Regulation 40, CFR Part 86, Subpart A 40 CFR 86.008-10, Emission standards for 2008 and later model year otto-cycle heavy-duty engines and vehicles

US2008

  • All ‘0’s in test regime codes are numbers not letters.
  • Where a specific exemption has been granted, the word ‘EXEMPT’ will be entered in the test regime field.
  • The LANDATA low volume vehicle code for any low volume vehicle certified to the LVV emissions standard is ‘LZZZZZ’.
  • For keying fuel consumption as unknown, enter one of the following test regime codes:

AZZZZZ – Australian unknown

EZZZZZ – European unknown

JZZZZZ – Japanese unknown

J999 – Vehicle year 2000 (manufactured in 1999 but first registered in 2000)

UZZZZZ – United States unknown


Table 28-1-1. Euro 4 light vehicle emissions limits
Light vehicles with a GVM of 2500kg or lessLight vehicles with a GVM greater than 2500kg

Petrol  (g/km)

Diesel  (g/km)

Petrol  (g/km)

Diesel  (g/km)

CO

1.0

0.5

2.27 0.74

HC

0.1

n/a

0.16 n/a

NOx

0.08

0.25

0.11 0.39

HC+NOx

n/a

0.3

n/a 0.46

PM

n/a

0.025

n/a 0.06

Note: For the avoidance of doubt, if emissions values are being used to determine compliance, these are to be the official certification values (ie not derived from an in-service emissions test). Emissions values for all gases/particulates must be below the limit values set out in the table.

The NZ Transport Agency has previously issued some individual exemptions to vehicles having 96/69/EC as the Emissions Test method. No further emissions exemptions will be issued to such vehicles border checked after 1 December 2016.

Figure 28-1-1. De-registration certificate (Japan)

De-registration certificate (Japan)

Page amended 2 December 2019 (see amendment details).

29 Declaration for supplementary restraint system, anti-lock braking system and ESC system inspections

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This document applies to vehicles that require diagnostic checks on electronic control systems during entry certification, for faults identified in the entry or in-service requirements.

Safety concerns

The growing trend towards electronic control of safety-related systems in vehicles means that the repair and re-instatement of electronic control systems is increasingly important. However, specialist equipment and knowledge is required to interrogate the electronic control systems of the various makes and models of vehicles in New Zealand’s fleet. It is important that a vehicle inspector has confidence in any given electronic control system diagnosis.

When the declaration is required
  • When the warning lamp on SRS, ABS and ESC systems illuminates it indicates a fault. Once the fault has been rectified an SRS/ABS/ESC declaration must be supplied by a person listed in 'Inspection requirements' below.
  • If the vehicle is flagged at the border as damaged for warning lamp, and SRS/ABS/ESC declaration must be obtained to remove the flag.
Inspection requirements

Diagnostic checks on electronic control systems, such as supplementary restraint systems (SRS), anti-lock braking systems (ABS) or electronic stability control (ESC) must be carried out by one of the following:

a) The manufacturer of the vehicle or the component, or an approved representative proven to be competent in the use of suitable interrogation equipment.

b) A person or company recognised as reputable and competent by the vehicle inspector, and trained in the interrogation of automotive electronic control systems. This person/company must be proven to have access to and be competent in the use of suitable interrogation equipment.

c) An entry certifier or border entry certifier, trained in the interrogation of automotive electronic control systems, working under an Transport Agency-approved standard operating procedure (Note 1).

A Declaration form for ABS, SRS and/or ESC inspections must be completed by the person/company carrying out a diagnostic check on an automotive electronic control system.
A copy of the declaration must be retained with the vehicle file.

Note 1

A Transport Agency-approved standard operating procedure is developed by the entry certifier and assessed by the Transport Agency to see if it meets requirements including safety and other risk mitigation. For further information on developing a standard operating procedure contact the Transport Agency Vehicles team at vehicles@nzta.govt.nz.

Additional contents

Page amended 1 December 2016 (see amendment details).

30 Dual brake systems in overseas driving school vehicles

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

This bulletin applies to vehicles that are fitted or equipped with dual brake systems for use in Japanese driving schools, which:

  • are fitted with two sets of pedals, and
  • are not going to be operated in service as driving school vehicles in New Zealand.
Requirements

1. The left-side pedals and their complete operating system must be removed from the vehicle.

2. The vehicle must be low volume vehicle (LVV) certified.

Note 1

If the second brake pedal acts onto an umodified original-equipment driver's pedal, the additional equipment may be removed to return the vehicle to original specification without LVV certification being required.

Assistance for vehicle owners

For some popular vehicle types, approved conversion procedures have been established.

The Low Volume Vehicle Technical Association (LVVTA) or Imported Motor Vehicle Industry Association (IMVIA) may provide further information for vehicle owners.

Page updated 5 December 2014.

31 Brakes standards compliance

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

Under Land Transport Rule: Heavy Vehicle Brakes 2006, when a heavy powered vehicle undergoes entry-level certification in New Zealand, proof that the vehicle was manufactured to meet an approved brakes standard may be required.

This technical bulletin applies to all class MD3, MD4, ME, NB and NC vehicles being certified for entry into New Zealand that are required to meet approved brakes standards.

Any one of the following methods may be used to prove a vehicle was manufactured to meet approved brake standards.

Acceptable proof of brakes rule compliance for new or used vehicles manufactured for the Japanese market

1. A vehicle manufactured in Japan for the Japanese market on or after 1 July2000, but not previously registered in Japan, an original completion inspection certificate
Example: See Reference material 23, or

2. A vehicle manufactured in Japan for the Japanese market and previously registered in Japan on or after 1 July 2000, an original Japanese de-registration, export or detailed registration history certificate
Example: See Reference material 20, 21, 22 and 24.

Note These vehicles will meet Japanese Technical Standards.

Acceptable proof of brakes rule compliance for new or used vehicles manufactured for the Australian market

An ADR compliance plate on a vehicle manufactured on or after 1 July 1979. Note: If the ADR plate lists individual rules, ADR 35 must be listed for proof of compliance.

Example: See Reference material 32.

Acceptable proof of brakes rule compliance for new or used vehicles manufactured for the European market

1. An EC whole vehicle approval plate
Example: See Reference material 29, or

2. A UN/ECE compliance plate listing an approved brakes standard
Example: See Reference material 28.

Acceptable proof of brakes rule compliance for used vehicles manufactured for the United Kingdom market

A vehicle manufactured for the United Kingdom market and previously registered in the United Kingdom on or after 1 May 2002 is compliant. A UK registration certification will show the date of first registration.

Example: See Reference material 59.

Acceptable proof of brakes compliance for new or used vehicles manufactured for the US market

1. Original documents confirming the vehicle was manufactured for the US market and would be permitted for use on public roads in the US, and a Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) plate or label affixed to the vehicle
Example: See Reference material 30 and 31, or

2. An FMVSS plate or label affixed to a vehicle with air brakes manufactured on or after 1 January 1975, or a vehicle with hydraulic brakes manufactured on or after 1 September 1983, or a vehicle with electric brakes manufactured on or after 1 November 1997, and original documents confirming the vehicle was first registered in the US
Example: See Reference material 30.

Acceptable proof of brakes rule compliance for new or used vehicles manufactured anywhere

1. The vehicle make and model is listed here as distributed by the Motor Industry Association of New Zealand (MIA) and sold through its franchise dealer network, or

2. A statement of compliance including an approved brakes standard.

Example: See Reference material 19

Action

The appropriate brakes standard code must be entered into the standards code field in the ILOAD screen on LANDATA (refer to ILOAD screen pages in section 3 of the LATIS agents’ manual).

If the vehicle does not have evidence of compliance with an approved brakes standard, the entry inspector must fail the vehicle and refer the vehicle owner to the Transport Agency (phone 0800 699 000; mail PO Box 5084, Wellington 6145) for further advice.

Page amended 1 May 2017 (see amendment details).

32 Static tilt stability compliance

Vehicle inspection requirements manual references

This bulletin gives guidance to vehicle inspectors in applying the following requirements in the VIRM: Entry certification:

Application

Under Land Transport Rule: Passenger Service Vehicles 1999, when a heavy vehicle enters service as a PSV in New Zealand on or after 1 July 2000 it must demonstrate static tilt stability.

Any of the following vehicles listed in Table 1 below can be accepted as meeting this requirement.

Table 1: Vehicles meeting static tilt stability requirements.
Make Model Model code

Mitsubishi Fuso

Rosa

BE64DJRMBFAC

Mitsubishi Fuso

Rosa

BE64DJRMBFAD

Mitsubishi Fuso

Rosa

BE64DJRMUFBD

Mitsubishi Fuso

Rosa BE64DJRMUFBF

Mitsubishi Fuso

Rosa BE64DJRMBFBF

Mitsubishi Fuso

Rosa BE64DJRMBFBE

Mitsubishi Fuso

Rosa BE64DJRMBSCH

Mitsubishi Fuso

Rosa BE64DJRMBFAF

Fuso

Rosa custom auto BE64DJRMBFAF (C)

Fuso

Rosa custom auto BE64DJRMBFAF (CD)

Fuso

Rosa school auto BE64DJRMBFAF (S)

Fuso

Rosa school auto BE64DJRMBFAF (SD)

33 Category A left-hand drive vehicles

Situation

Under Land Transport Rule: Steering Systems Amendment (2010), a class MA left-hand drive vehicle under 20 years old may be certified for entry into New Zealand if it is granted a Category A left-hand drive vehicle permit by the Transport Agency.

The person issued with the Category A left-hand drive vehicle permit does not have to be the importer of the vehicle.

Application

This document applies to any class MA left-hand drive vehicle less than 20 years old that is undergoing entry certification in New Zealand, which has been granted a Category A left-hand drive vehicle permit and is appropriate for certification to enter service in New Zealand.

Obtaining Category A left-hand drive vehicle permits

To obtain a Category A left-hand drive vehicle permit, an applicant must:

1. apply to the Transport Agency before the vehicle is certified for entry into service in New Zealand; and

2. pay the appropriate fees specified in accordance with regulations made under the Act.

Note 1

All applications must have the applicant’s declarations witnessed by an entry certifier. The complete application with all the supporting evidence is then sent to the NZTA by the entry certifier.

A Category A left-hand drive vehicle permit may be issued if:
  • the Transport Agency considers that the class MA vehicle will be owned as a collector’s item, and it

a) is of historic value; or

b) is a model that was not manufactured in right-hand drive form, and

  • the applicant:

a) is a New Zealand citizen or resident, and

b) has not been issued with a Category A left-hand drive vehicle permit in the last two years, and

c) has submitted a complete and correct application, including a signed declaration, and

d) has paid to the Transport Agency the appropriate fees specified in accordance with regulations made under the Act.

Qualifying criteria for Category A left-hand drive vehicle permits

To meet qualifying criteria for a Category A left-hand drive vehicle permit, the applicant must provide evidence that the vehicle model was not manufactured in right-hand drive form and meets at least three of the following requirements:

  • The class MA vehicle (or its make, model and sub-model) is identified as being a collector’s item in a commercially produced motoring publication
  • The class MA vehicle’s make, model and sub-model has been (or was) manufactured in annual volumes of 20,000 units or less
  • The class MA vehicle is, and was manufactured as:

a) a two-door coupe, or

b) a convertible

  • The class MA vehicle is, and was manufactured as a high-performance vehicle.
Conditions for Category A left-hand drive vehicle permits

1. The Transport Agency may not issue more than 500 Category A left-hand drive vehicle permits in any calendar year.

2. A Category A left-hand drive vehicle permit ceases to be valid if the vehicle is not inspected at the border or certified for entry within six months of the date of issue.

Note 2

A Category A left-hand drive permit that ceases to be valid in the calendar year it was issued will not be counted as part of the quota of 500 per annum.


Inspection

The following flowchart explains the procedure for processing a Category A left-hand drivevehicle for entry certification.

Category A LHD flowchart

Step 1 – Documentation

Category A left-hand drive vehicles must still meet those standards applicable to the vehicle (according to age, etc).

The VIRM: Entry certification details the standards a vehicle and its components are required to meet. See Inspection & certification Table 1-1-1 for methods to demonstrate compliance with required standards.

Where compliance with an approved standard cannot be proven by these methods, the following methods are acceptable alternatives:

  • visual confirmation and recording of standards for items such as lighting, glazing, tyres and so on.
  • low volume vehicle (LVV) certification for modified components, such as brakes, steering and suspension.
  • a letter of exemption from the NZTA for specific items not covered above. Application forms for exemptions can be obtained from the NZTA website.

Step 2 – Submit to the NZTA for processing

The completed application form (see Reference material 51) and all required documentation for a Category A left-hand drive vehicle permit must be submitted to:

Vehicle Compliance Specialist
Customer Access (Assessments)
NZ Transport Agency
Private Bag 6995
Wellington 6141

A letter advising of the result (approved or declined) and the permit (if approved) will be sent to the entry certifier for forwarding to the applicant.

Step 3 – Compliance inspection

Category A left-hand drive vehicles must be inspected according to the requirements outlined in the VIRM: Entry certification.

If a vehicle has been modified, it must have LVV certification.

If there is evidence of previous structural repairs, structural damage or corrosion to a vehicle, it must be referred to a repair certifier for inspection and certification.

Step 4 – MR2A completion and vehicle registration

1. Entry certifiers must retain copies of all documentation in their original form for a minimum of two years. If the vehicle owner requests that original documents be returned to them, verified copies must be retained in the vehicle file. The recipient’s name and the reason for return must be recorded in the LANDATA notes.

2. Where code A is entered, a note stating the following must be added to the vehicle notes:
‘Vehicle ceases to qualify for left-hand drive exemption if the registered owner changes before [DDMMYYYY]’.
The date specified must be either four years after first registration in New Zealand or when the vehicle reaches 20 years of age, whichever is earlier.

The owner’s name must match the name shown on the permit.

3. Update LANDATA with special permit code A.

4. The MR2A must be completed and printed in the name of the person registering the vehicle. This must be the same as the name shown on the permit.

5. The vehicle must be registered in the name of the person registering the vehicle before a warrant of fitness can be issued.

If an entry certifier wishes to deviate from these instructions, they must obtain written approval from the Transport Agency.

34 Bridgestone tyres manufactured in Thailand, Taiwan or Indonesia

Deleted as at 1 August 2012.

35 Moped entry certification (class LA, LB)

Situation

Under the Land Transport Rule: Vehicle Standards Compliance Amendment 2011, a vehicle of class LA or LB is required to undergo entry certification when entering service. A moped first registered in New Zealand prior to 1 July 2011 is exempt from certification and VIN under the Rule. However, they must be confirmed for classification, previous registration and ownership as required by the Land Transport (Motor Vehicle Registration and Licencing) Regulations 2011.

Application

This bulletin contains instructions for vehicle inspectors on how to handle entry certification of new, used and re-registered mopeds (class LA, LB).

Definition of a moped

A moped is defined as follows:

LA (moped with two wheels)

A motor vehicle (other than a power-assisted pedal cycle) that:

a) has two wheels, and

b) either:

i) has an engine cylinder capacity not exceeding 50ml and a maximum speed not exceeding 50km/h, or

ii) has a power source other than a piston engine and a maximum speed not exceeding 50km/h.

 

LB (moped with three wheels)

A motor vehicle (other than a power-assisted pedal cycle) that:

a) has three wheels, and

b) either:

i) has an engine cylinder capacity not exceeding 50ml and a maximum speed not exceeding 50km/h, or

ii) has a power source other than a piston engine and a maximum speed not exceeding 50km/h.

Note 1

In order to determine the maximum speed of a moped, the following documentation may be accepted:

  • Statement of Compliance(SoC) from the vehicle manufacture stating the maximum speed, (see 2.1 of Inspection and certification for SOC requirements)
  • A letter or email from the vehicle manufacturer stating the VIN and maximum speed
  • Technical specifications from the vehicle manufacture showing the maximum speed for that particular make and model
  • EC Certificate of Conformity (CoC) issued by the vehicle manufacture for individual vehicles that have undergone European Commission Whole Vehicle Type Approval (EC WVTA). The CoC is linked to the EC Whole Vehicle Approval Plate – if a vehicle has a COC, it will also have a Whole Vehicle Approval Plate.
  • A sample CoC is shown in Reference material 49. The maximum speed information is recorded in item 44 of the CoC.
Note 2

The flowcharts under the 'Procedure' tab guide the inspector through the moped certification process:

  • new mopeds – Flowchart A
  • used mopeds, never registered in New Zealand – Flowchart B
  • used mopeds, registered in New Zealand before 1 July 2011 – Flowchart C
  • used Mopeds, registered in New Zealand on or after 1 July 2011 – Flowchart D.
Note 3

Vehicles complying with the European vehicle category L1e can be accepted as meeting all class LA moped requirements.

Note 4

There is no requirement to issue a LT4085N or LT4085U at the completion of the inspection process.

Inspection requirements

The physical inspection of a moped is not required to take place at a Transport Agency approved site. The off-site location must meet the requirements of the inspection premises and equipment in Section 8 of the Introduction, VIRM: Entry certification with the exeption of VIN embossing machines. It is the responsibility of the inspecting organisation and the vehicle inspector to ensure that these requirements are meet. The physical address of the off-site must be noted in on the vehicle file.


Flowchart A. New parallel imported moped

Inspection requirements

The following flowchart explains the procedure for processing a new parallel imported moped for entry certification.

new parallel

Note 1

For all documentation requirements see Required documentation and registration.

Note 2

Whilst no warrant of fitness (WoF) is required for a moped, it must still be inspected to ensure it is in a roadworthy condition.

Note 3

A tyre on a moped does not have any tread-depth requirements, but must have a clearly visible tread pattern across at least three-quarters of the width of the tread and around the entire circumference of the tyre.

Flowchart B. Used imported moped

Inspection requirements

The following flowchart explains the procedure for processing a used imported moped for entry certification.

use imported

Note 1

A strip-down of the brakes is not required.

Note 2

For all documentation requirements see Required documentation and registration.

Note 2

Whilst no warrant of fitness (WoF) is required for a moped, it must still be inspected to ensure it is in a roadworthy condition.

Flowchart C. Re-registered moped that was first registered in New Zealand before 1 July 2011

Inspection requirements

The following flowchart explains the procedure for processing a re-registered moped that was first registered in New Zealand before 1 July 2011.

These vehicles are exempt from standards certification and VINs under the Rule, but they must be confirmed as:

  1. being a moped (as defined in the VIRM),
  2. being previously registered in New Zealand before 1 July 2011, and
  3. owned by the person presenting it for re-registration in order to meet the requirements of Regulation 4(1)(f) of the Land Transport (Motor Vehicle Registration and Licencing) Regulations 2011.

These requirements can be confirmed by a staff member who is appropriately trained and supported and is working at a site authorised for compliance certification of light vehicles for registration and re-registration and is not limited to just an entry certifier.

before 1 july 2011

Note 1

For all documentation requirements see Required documentation and registration.

Flowchart D. Re-registered moped that was first registered in New Zealand on or after 1 July 2011

Inspection requirements

The following flowchart explains the procedure for processing a re-registered moped that was first registered in New Zealand on or after 1 July 2011.

after 1 july 2011

Note 1

A strip-down of the brakes is not required.

Note 2

For all documentation requirements see Required documentation and registration.

Note 3

Whilst no warrant of fitness (WoF) is required for a moped, it must still be inspected to ensure it is in a roadworthy condition.

Note 4

A tyre on a moped does not have any tread-depth requirements, but must have a clearly visible tread pattern across at least three-quarters of the width of the tread and around the entire circumference of the tyre.

Page amended 28 April 2014 (see amendment details).

36 Removing a border damage flag

Background

‘Request to remove border damage flag’ (Reference material 17) forms are to be processed by the entry certifier.

When a border inspection organisation identifies damage on a vehicle during the border check inspection, the vehicle will be flagged as damaged on LANDATA.

Light vehicles

Refer to VIRM: Entry certification, Inspection and certification, 3-4 Vehicle structure – Threshold for requiring repair certification. If the entry certifier determines that the damage does not exceed the threshold for requiring repair certification, an application must be made to remove the damage flag.

A repair certifier can determine whether or not a light vehicle may have a border damage flag removed once the vehicle has been repaired in accordance with the requirements of the VIRM: Light vehicle repair certification. This is recorded on the LT308 issued. If required, the entry certifier must complete an application to remove the damage flag.

Heavy vehicles

Once the appropriate heavy vehicle specialist certification has been carried out (including an LT400 to cover the repairs to the vehicle) the entry certifier must complete an application to remove the damage flag.

Form

A ‘Request to remove border damage flag’ form is available in Reference material 17. The entry certifier completes the form and gives it to the supervisor authorised to remove damage flags.

Procedures

To remove the damage flag (in LANDATA):

Step

Action

1

Check the form has been fully completed by an authorised inspector.

2

Go to the border damage note in the NOTES screen.

Check that these relate to the damage indicated by the vehicle inspector and that the damage does not exceed the threshold for requiring repair certification..

3

View the border check inspection record in the VPORT screen. Refer to the LANDATA manual.

4

In the Maintenance field at the top of the VPORT screen, type ‘CHG’.

5

In the Damage note field, type ‘N’.

6

Transmit.

7

The border damage flag removal form must be kept by the entry certifier for at least two years.

Page amended 1 November 2014 (see amendment details).

37 Electronic stability control identification

Identification of Electronic Stability Control (ESC)

The following evidence is acceptable proof that the vehicle is fitted with an ESC system:

  • The presence and correct operation of appropriate ESC tell-tale indicators on the vehicle’s dashboard
  • A Statement of Compliance showing ESC fitment
  • A tell-tale indicator like the symbol below refers to an ESC system:
  • A tell-tale indicator on the vehicle’s dashboard comprising one of the following acronyms:

AUDI

ESP (Electronic Stabilization Program)

BMW

DSC (Dynamic Stability Control)

DTC (Dynamic Traction Control)
Note: If a BMW has DTC displayed the vehicle can be accepted as containing an ESC system. The underlying technology to DTC includes DSC - which is an ESC system)

CRYSLER

ESP (Electronic Stability Program)

DAIHATSU

DVS (Daihatsu Vehicle Stability control system)

FORD

ESP (Electronic Stability Program)

DSC (Dynamic Stability Control)

GM

PSC (Precision Control System)

HOLDEN ESC (Electronic Stability Control)

HONDA

VSA (Vehicle Stability Assist)

JAGUAR

DSC (Dynamic Stability Control)

LANDROVER

DSC (Dynamic Stability Control)

LEXUS

VSC (Vehicle Stability Control)

VDIM (Vehicle Dynamics Integration Management)

MASERATI MSP (Maserati Stability Program)

MAZDA

DSC (Dynamic Stability Control)

MERCEDES-BENZ

ESP (Electronic Stability Program)

MITSUBISHI

ASC (Active Stability Control)

ASTC (Active Stability and Traction Control)

NISSAN

VDC (Vehicle Dynamics Control)

PORSCHE PSM (Porsche Stability Management)

SUBARU

VDC (Vehicle Dynamics Control)

SUZUKI

ESP (Electronic Stability Program)

TOYOTA

VDIM (Vehicle Dynamics Integration Management)

VSC (Vehicle Stability Control)

VOLVO

DSTC (Dynamic Stability and Traction Control)

VOLKSWAGEN

ESP (Electronic Stabilization Program)

The above list is not exhaustive, other manufacturer-specific symbols or acronyms may also be acceptable if the certifier is satisfied that the lamp refers to an ESC system.

However, a tell-tale indicator with the letters 'TC' or 'Traction Control' is not an indication of ESC fitment and cannot be accepted as such. The Transport Agency is aware of a letter provided by a Land Rover dealer erroneously stating that vehicles with 'TC' tell-tales are fitted with a form of ESC. This letter cannot be accepted as evidence of ESC fitment.

Identification of an ESC fault

An ESC fault is normally identified by the tell-tale indicator lamp not extinguishing at the conclusion of the self-check process initiated when the vehicle’s ignition is switched on.

Note 1

Similar to frontal impact and emissions requirements this provision will not apply to:

  • an immigrant’s vehicle, or
  • a special interest vehicle, or
  • a motorsport vehicle that is operated in accordance with the conditions of a valid low volume vehicle authority card issued for the vehicle in accordance with the Low Volume Vehicle Code, or
  • a motor vehicle manufactured, or first registered outside of New Zealand, twenty years or more before the date of its first certification for entry into service in New Zealand, or
  • a low volume vehicle that was:
    • manufactured, assembled or scratch-built in quantities of 500 or less in any one year (ie, not a uniquely modified low volume vehicle), and
    • not originally fitted with an electronic stability control system, and
    • is certified in accordance with the Low Volume Vehicle Code.

Page updated 2 December 2019 (see details)

38 Class MC vehicle definition

Purpose

With the introduction of mandatory electronic stability control (ESC) requirements for class MC vehicles border checked from 1 March 2016, clarification has been sought from the Transport Agency as to how the definition of class MC vehicles, as set out in Table A of the various Land Transport Rules, should be interpreted and applied.

This technical bulletin sets out the Transport Agency’s interpretation of the definition to enable it to be applied consistently by Entry Certifiers and vehicle importers.

Definition

A class MC vehicle is defined by Land Transport Rules as:

A passenger vehicle, designed with special features for off-road operation, that has not more than nine seating positions (including the driver's seating position), and that:

(a) has four-wheel drive; and

(b) has at least four of the following characteristics when the vehicle is unladen on a level surface and the front wheels are parallel to the vehicle's longitudinal centre-line and the tyres are inflated to the vehicle manufacturer's recommended pressure:

i. an approach angle of not less than 28 degrees;

ii. a breakover angle of not less than 14 degrees;

iii. a departure angle of not less than 20 degrees;

iv. a running clearance of not less than 200mm;

v. a front axle clearance, rear axle clearance, or suspension clearance of not less than 175mm.

Interpretation

The definition consists of two separate parts, both of which must be satisfied for a vehicle to be considered to be class MC. These are:

  1. Whether the vehicle has been designed with special features for off-road operation, and
  2. Whether the criteria set out in (a) and (b) of the definition are met.

A vehicle can be considered to have been “designed with special features for off-road operation” if it has been originally equipped with two or more features including, but not limited to:

  • A transfer case that engages or disengages power to the front or rear wheels, controlled manually or electronically
  • At least one locking differential, controlled manually or electronically
  • Selectable high and low gear ratio ranges, controlled manually or electronically
  • An electronic hill descent control system
  • Underbody protection systems (such as skid plates), designed primarily for off-road use
  • An electronic system for optimising the vehicle’s capability on off-road surfaces (such as Land Rover’s “Terrain Response” system).

If a vehicle has a drivetrain and transmission system that enables all four wheels to be driven at once, regardless of how this is actuated or selected, it has four-wheel drive for the purposes of sub-part (a).

With regards to sub-part (b), measurements are to be taken as per the following:

Class MC vehicle

Aftermarket add-ons such as bullbars, towbars and body kits are to be excluded for the purposes of the above measurements.

Running clearance is the height from the ground of the lowest point on the vehicle, excluding any unsprung component. When determining the lowest point, aftermarket components, lightweight plastic covers and mudflaps are to be excluded, but original equipment exhaust systems are to be included.

Suspension clearance is the height from the ground of the lowest point of any suspension component.

The class of a vehicle make, model and submodel is defined by measurements and technical assessment of the vehicle in its original, unmodified form. For example, if a vehicle model is class MC in its original form, all vehicles of that make, model and submodel are to be treated as class MC, even if individual examples have been modified in a way that would mean they do not meet class MC criteria.

Determining vehicle class

Acceptable means of determining class include (but are not limited to) the following:

  1. Physical measurements of the vehicle, provided it is in an original and unmodified condition, along with an appraisal of its off-road features.
  2. Information provided or produced by the vehicle manufacturer specifying sufficient technical and dimensional data to enable an assessment to be made as to whether the definition is met.

Once the class of a vehicle make/model/submodel (or particular model code) has been conclusively determined using one of the above methods, the same classification may be applied to other examples of the same make/model/submodel without additional verification.

LANDATA vehicle classifications for vehicles entry certified prior to 1 March 2016 may not be reliable and should not be used to determine the class of models certified after that date.

Forward control vehicles

The definition of class MB vehicle is as follows:

A passenger vehicle (other than a class MC vehicle):

(a) that has not more than nine seating positions (including the drivers seating position); and

(b) in which the centre of the steering wheel is in the forward quarter of the vehicle's total length.

When assessing a forward-control vehicle against the class MB and MC definitions, the assessment against class MC should be carried out first. If the vehicle meets the class MC criteria, then it is a class MC vehicle regardless of whether it also meets criteria (b) in the above class MB definition.

Page updated 1 February 2017 (see details)

39 Identifying class MB, MD1 or MD2 based on seats on Japanese deregistration certificates

Reference
Background

Some vans are entering New Zealand with a number of seats stated on the Japanese deregistration certificate that would place them in vehicle class MD1 or MD2. There is a requirement that vehicles must be compliant in the class they sit in as imported. Therefore a van with a deregistration certificate that states 10-12 seats (and has a GVM not exceeding 3.5t) is an MD1 and one whose deregistration certificate states 13 or more seats (and has a GVM not exceeding 3.5t) is an MD2. Each must be entry certified as the class determined by the number of seats on the deregistration certificate.

However, some of these seating positions, as defined by Japan, are either wheelchair positions or occasional seats (often referred to as dickie seats or jump seats). In New Zealand, the occasional seats are not suitable as seating positions nor do they have the appropriate seatbelts. Also, many importers would prefer to remove the occasional seats and discard them. The issue is the vehicle would then become a 9-seater (or 12-seater) and therefore change class to an MB (or MD1). In both these situations these vehicles would be deemed non-compliant MD1s (or MD2s) and would either have to be brought in line to meet MD1 (or MD2) requirements or have an exemption issued at a cost.

Application

The standards requirements for MD2, MD1 and MB class are identical providing the gross vehicle mass (GVM) is over 2500kg. The following resolution is for vans with a GVM over 2500kg entering the country with a deregistration certificate stating more than nine seats:

  • If these vehicles meet the requirements for MB (or MD1) class apart from the number of seats stated on the deregistration certificate, they can be considered MB (or MD1) class providing that they have nine or fewer seats (or 12 or fewer in the case of a change from MD2 to MD1) that meet New Zealand requirements, and the seating is original equipment. Wheelchair positions or occasional seats that have been removed are to be excluded from the seat count.
Examples

Vehicle class at import

Number of seats (incl. dickie seats and wheelchair positions)

Number of dickie seats/wheelchair positions removed

Updated number of seats

New vehicle class

MD1

10

1

9

MB

MD2

14

2

12

MD1

Page amended 1 June 2019 (see amendment details)

40 Passenger airbag inspection – used imported vehicles from Japan

November 2016 | Version 2


Background

Since 2013, a number of vehicle manufacturers have initiated recalls to replace frontal airbags manufactured by Takata due to a risk of incorrect deployment that can result in the release of metal shrapnel from the airbag inflator unit. Due to the number of affected vehicles, the supply of replacement parts has been delayed in a number of cases, resulting in lengthy delay before recalls can be completed.

The NZ Transport Agency has been made aware of a practice in Japan where front passenger airbags have been disconnected by the vehicle manufacturer’s agent as an interim measure pending the availability of parts needed to carry out the recall on the vehicle. The disconnection process involves fitting an electronic component to simulate the presence of the airbag so that the warning light operates as normal. A number of vehicles with disconnected airbags have already been imported into New Zealand in this condition, and the influx of vehicles in this condition is likely to continue in the foreseeable future.

Land Transport Rule: Frontal Impact 2001 requires that frontal airbags and airbag warning lights must not be rendered inoperable. As such, vehicles that have had their airbags disconnected cannot be entry certified.

Since version 1 of this bulletin, the Transport Agency has received additional information on the vehicles that may have had their passenger airbags disconnected, and how to determine whether a recall has been completed on an affected vehicle. This enables the range of vehicles requiring physical inspection to be limited to those identified in the attached Table 40-1-1. This is a change from the previous version of this bulletin: the list is now a list of included models that must be checked.

Action required

For used vehicles from Japan identified in Table 40-1-1, entry certifiers are required to visually verify that the front passenger airbags are present and connected to the SRS system.

This is to be achieved by accessing the airbag unit and checking that it is properly connected to the SRS wiring loom, ensuring that there is no evidence of tampering and that no devices designed to defeat or ‘fool’ the SRS self-diagnostic function are present. If the airbag is disconnected, it must be reconnected before the vehicle is entry certified.

SRS system wiring and plugs are yellow in colour. Below are images of a passenger airbag that has been disconnected with a resistor put in place to defeat the self-diagnostic system (Figure 40-1-2), and another with the airbag properly connected (Figure 40-1-3).

Once it has been determined that the front passenger airbag is properly connected to the SRS wiring loom, and that the SRS warning light is operating correctly, the following wording must be entered into the notes field in LANDATA:

FR PSNGR Airbag Inspected

Note: Normal safe working practices must be followed for any work on airbag systems. The vehicle’s battery must be disconnected at least five minutes prior to commencing work on any system involving a pyrotechnic component.

Exceptions

No visual inspection is required if there is evidence that the Takata airbag recall has already been completed on the vehicle. This can be determined by the presence of a sticker located in the driver or passenger door frame area (usually near the striker). This sticker will resemble the one in the below image, and contain the official Japanese recall campaign number. If the number on the vehicle being inspected matches one in Table 40-1-1, the recall has been completed and no visual inspection of the passenger airbag is necessary. The recall campaign numbers listed in Table 40-1-1 do not correspond to particular models, so any of the numbers listed against a make will be acceptable.

Figure 40-1-1. Airbag recall completed sticker

sticker

Figure 40-1-2. Airbag disconnected

Airbag disconnected

Figure 40-1-3. Airbag properly connected

Airbag properly connected

Table 40-1-1. Passenger airbag inspection – included models

The following makes and models require physical inspection of passenger airbags. This list is at a make/model/year level only, but entry certifiers have the option of using an alternative list including chassis number ranges available online at http://rightcar.govt.nz/possibly-disabled-airbags.

Make

Models

Recall Campaign Numbers

Honda

ACCORD  (2002-2011)

ACCORD TOUR  (2008)

ACCORD TOURER  (2009-2011)

ACCORD WAGON  (2002-2007)

CIVIC  (2005-2010)

CIVIC FERIO  (2000-2005)

CIVIC GX  (2004)

CIVIC HYBRID  (2001-2010)

CR-V  (2001-2011)

ELEMENT  (2003-2005)

ELYSION  (2004-2011)

ELYSION PRESTIGE  (2004-2011)

FCX CLARITY  (2008-2010)

FIT  (2001-2011)

FIT ARIA  (2002-2008)

FIT SHUTTLE  (2011)

FREED  (2008-2011)

FREED SPIKE  (2010-2011)

INSIGHT  (2008-2011)

INSIGHT EXCLUSIVE  (2011)

INSPIRE  (2007-2011)

LEGEND  (2004-2011)

MDX  (2002-2006)

MOBILIO  (2001-2008)

3375

3493

3568

3582

3826

3889

GAI-2058

GAI-2059

GAI-2060

GAI-2127

GAI-2174

GAI-2175

GAI-2190

GAI-2348

Isuzu

C M  (2004-2007)

COMO  (2001-2008)

3381

3492

3569

3601

Lexus

IS 250  (2005-2011)

IS 250 C  (2009-2011)

IS 350  (2005-2011)

IS 350 C  (2010-2011)

IS F  (2007-2011)

SC430  (2005-2010)

3591

3781

3820

Mazda

ATENZA  (2002-2007)

RX-8  (2003-2012)

BONGO  (2010-2016)

DEMIO  (2007-2014)

3376

3579

3586

3731

3839

3840

Mitsubishi

DELICA  (2010-2011)

i (2005-2012)

LANCER  (2004-2008)

3576

3588

3839

Nissan

BLUEBIRD SYLPHY (2001-2005)

CARAVAN  (2001-2009)

CEFIRO  (2001-2002)

CUBE  (2001-2002)

DATSUN  (2001-2002)

FUGA  (2004-2008)

LIBERTY  (2001-2004)

PRESAGE  (2003-2009)

SAFARI  (2002-2007)

TEANA  (2002-2008)

X-TRAIL  (2001-2007)

3381

3492

3569

3601

3674

3839

Subaru

Impreza  (2004-2007)

Legacy  (2003-2009)

3578

3825

Toyota

ALLEX (2001-2006)

Alphard (2008-2009)

ALPHARD G  (2002-2008)

ALPHARD HYBRID  (2003-2008)

Alphard V  (2002-2008)

Auris (2006-2009)

AVENSIS (2003-2008)

AVENSIS WAGON  (2003-2008)

Belta (2005-2008)

Berta (2009-2011)

Blade (2006-2009)

BREVIS (2001-2007)

COROLLA (2000-2006)

COROLLA FIELDER  (2000-2009)

Corolla Lumion  (2007-2009)

COROLLA RUNX  (2000-2009)

GAIA (2001-2004)

IPSUM (2001-2009)

MARK II  (2000-2004)

MARK II BLIT  (2001-2007)

NOAH (2001-2009)

Opa (2002-2005)

Probox (2002-2011)

SOARER (2001-2005)

SUCCEED (2002-2011)

Velfire (2008-2009)

Verossa (2001-2004)

VITZ (2005-2010)

VOXY (2001-2009)

WiLL CYPHA  (2002-2005)

WiLL VS  (2001-2004)

3369

3483

3563

3591

3592

3651

3696

3781

3911

Page added 4 October 2015, updated November 2016 (see details)

41 Entry certification procedures for certain modified vehicles


Certain modifications to vehicles that have been certified overseas to a process accepted by the Transport agency do not need specialist inspection and certification.

Important: Exhaust emissions compliance isn’t guaranteed and must be verified by one of the methods specified in Technical Bulletin 28.

Applicable legislation: Land Transport Rule Vehicle Standards Compliance 2002 6.5(3).

Overseas modification certification that can be accepted without referral to a specialist certifier

The following European, Australian and United States certifications can be accepted if no subsequent modifications have been made. Check for subsequent modifications and check the details on the Certificate of Conformity, ADR SSM label/plate or FMVSS label/plate against the vehicle. If there are any differences, eg the number of seats or subsequent modifications, then the overseas certification cannot be accepted – refer to a specialist certifier.

For heavy vehicles, the final stage manufacturer is to be considered the de facto manufacturer. While some modifications are allowed, any items generally requiring heavy vehicle specialist certification (eg logging bolster attachments, towing connections, stockcrate anchorage points, load anchorage points, conversion of a vehicle to right-hand drive, conversion of a vehicle to dual steering, etc.) are not excepted from the requirement to be certified by a specialist certifier.

Ratings such as GVM given by the final stage manufacturer under the accepted certification are to be used.

European vehicles

Any vehicle, including a motorhome, that has been modified and type certified to the European Community Whole Vehicle Type Approval (ECWVTA) system. The vehicle must have an ECWVTA final stage (this may be second, third or fourth stage) Certificate of Conformity (CoC) and a corresponding label/plate on the vehicle.

Note 1

A motorhome may have final stage approval to 2001/116/EC provided it was approved to 2007/46/EC at an earlier approval stage (ie there is a base or second stage approval label listing 2007/46/EC in addition to the 2001/116/EC final stage label).

Note 2

If the vehicle doesn’t have a first (or second - only in the case of the final stage being the third stage) approval to 2007/46/EC, it must be referred to a specialist certifier.

sample plate

Australian vehicles

Any vehicle, including a motorhome, that has been modified and type certified to the Australian Motor Vehicle Certification Board Second Stage of Manufacture (also called ADR second stage of manufacture, ADR SSM). The vehicle must have a corresponding plate/label affixed.

The plate/label must be silver in colour. If the word ‘nonstandard’ or the phrase 'low volume’ appears on the plate/label the certification cannot be accepted, refer to a specialist certifier.

SSM plate

United States vehicles

Note: some United States vehicles covered by this bulletin (eg motorhomes and stretched limousines less than 20 years old) may require RHD conversion, and this will require low volume vehicle or heavy vehicle specialist certification. Purpose-built hearses are able to remain in LHD form.

Motorhomes

Any used imported motor home (previously registered in the USA) that has an FMVSS approval plate (fitted by the motor home manufacturer). If there is any doubt, refer to vehicles@nzta.govt.nz to get confirmation of acceptance of the certification, providing photos of the VIN, all FMVSS plates/labels (first and second stage) and photos of the vehicle layout and features (beds, seats, tables, cooking and washing facilities).

Any new motor home that has an FMVSS approval plate (fitted by the motor home manufacturer), provided there are original documents confirming the motor home was manufactured for the US market and would be permitted for use on public roads in the US.

Note: Conversion vans (aka day vans) are not motorhomes as they are not a dwelling place. If there is any doubt, refer to vehicles@nzta.govt.nz to get confirmation of the classification, providing photos of the VIN, all FMVSS plates/labels (first and second stage) and photos of the vehicle layout and features (beds, seats, tables, cooking and washing facilities).

Hearses or limousines

A vehicle modified or partially manufactured by a coachbuilder recognised and authorised by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) under either the Cadillac Master Coachbuilder or Ford Qualified Vehicle Modifier programmes. The vehicle must have a corresponding plate/label affixed. Refer to Appendix 2 for details of qualifying vehicles.

FMVSS

IVCERT vehicle certification screen

The modification certification must be entered into the IVCERT screen as below.

Field name

Enter

Description

Type

ECTA

European Community Whole Vehicle Type Approval (ECWVTA)

ADR2

Australian Motor Vehicle Certification Board Second Stage of Manufacture, also called ADR second stage of manufacture

USMH

A vehicle converted into a motorhome that has an FMVSS second stage of manufacture plate/label

USCB

A vehicle modified or partially manufactured by a coachbuilder recognised and authorised by the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) under either the Cadillac Master Coachbuilder or Ford Qualified Vehicle Modifier programmes

Number

For ECTA

The approval numbers unique 4 digit code and 2 digit suffix.

eg if the number on the plate/ label is “e11*2007/46*0851*01” enter 085101

For ADR2

The 5 digit approval number on the plate/label

For USMH and USCB

The date of manufacture of the completed vehicle from the FMVSS label.  In MMYYYY format

Issue ID

The entry certifiers ID

Issue Date

Date of entry certification

Comments

Description of the modifications observed and the modifications recorded on the CoC and labels/plates.

Include the coachbuilders or second stage manufacturers name if applicable.

Where appropriate use the abbreviations listed below.

IVCERT screen example

IVERT screen

Abbreviations

ADJ

Adjustable

BDYKT

Body kit

CHASS

Chassis

CLMN

Column

CONV

Conversion

CUST

Custom

CYL

Cylinder

DR

Door

ENG

Engine

EXTN

Extension

F

Front

F-GLASS

Fibreglass

GVM

GVM Increase

H-D/DUTY

Heavy duty

HNDLS

Handles

HYD

Hydraulic

L

Left

MAN

Manual

M-Home

Motorhome

OE

Original equipment

PWR

Power

POS

Position

RHD

Right hand drive conversion

R

Right

Rr

Rear

RMP

Ramp

RSTRNTS

Restraints

S-BELT

Seatbelt

STNWGN

Station wagon

SYS

System

TNK

Tank

WCH

Wheelchair

X-MEM

Crossmember

Appendix 1: EC Certificate of conformity

COC 1COC 2
Coc 2.2CoC 2.3

Appendix 2 : Information on Recognised Coachbuilt Vehicles

FMVSS acceptance for GM Cadillac and Ford Lincoln Conversion Chassis.

Ford and GM partner with selected approved modifiers, providing them with specific part-built vehicles and incomplete FMVSS compliance, to be completed as a hearse or stretched limousine.

Overseas modification certification that can be accepted without referral to a specialist certifier

Master Coachbuilders modify XTS Professional Vehicle Chassis that are specifically engineered, designed and built for heavy-duty application and coachbuilder conversion. The conversions must be completed by a certified Cadillac Master Coachbuilder. To find a list of Cadillac Master Coachbuilders go to: www.gmfleet.com/resources/cadillac-master-coach-builders.

Cadillac models covered by this program are:

  • W30 Extended Sedan
  • V4U Limousine
  • B9Q Hearse

Ford Motor Company Qualified Vehicle Modifiers (QVM) Program assists approved manufacturers in developing a high-quality conversion process, the Ford and Lincoln conversion chassis are specifically designed by Ford to meet rigorous industry requirements. The conversions must be completed by a Ford Motor Company Qualified Vehicle Modifier (QVM). To find a list of Qualified Vehicle Modifiers go to: www.fleet.ford.com/showroom/limo-livery-and-funeral/qualified-vehicle-modifiers.

Ford Motor Company models covered by this program are:

  • Lincoln MKT Towncar Hearse
  • Lincoln MKT Towncar Limousine

The models listed above, when modified or partially manufactured under their respective recognised coachbuilder programs, are accepted without need for specialist certification provided that:

a) compliance with FMVSS is confirmed by a valid FMVSS plate or label which, incorporates the vehicle chassis number, the approved company’s name, is permanently attached to the vehicle (refer image above); and

b) the modifications made to the vehicle which are approved under the FMVSS are recorded in Landata, in the manner prescribed above; and

c) The vehicle complies with applicable requirements for LHD vehicles. A hearse manufactured by a recognised coachbuilder under this regime is able to remain in LHD form as a Category C4 Specialist Vehicle.

d) the vehicle has not been further modified since the issue of FMVSS compliance. In the event that the vehicle has undergone conversion to RHD, this aspect of the vehicle will require specialist certification (Note 2).

Note 1

Such approval is an alternative to the low volume vehicle certification process, and any vehicle to which FMVSS applies must meet all other normal compliance requirements so as to enable the vehicle to be entry certified.

Note 2

Further modified, in relation to this technical bulletin, means modified beyond those modifications listed within the LVVTA LVV Modification Threshold Schedule.

Page amended 2 December 2019 (see amendment details).

42 Conversion vans (AKA day vans)

Due to significant safety concerns, the Transport Agency has determined that all conversion vans (also known as day vans) will require LVV certification before they can enter service in New Zealand. Any second stage certification is not recognised by the Transport Agency.

What are conversion vans?

Any class MB or MD van that was built for the American market and has been customized for comfort can be considered a conversion van. Conversion vans can have some of the features of a camper van or motorhome, but are typically more upscale and designed for everyday use. These vans may have a raised roof, custom paint job, custom wheels, leather seats, captain’s chairs, made-to-order stereo systems, custom-installed TVs DVD/Blu ray players, etc. These custom elements can reduce the safety of the vehicle while giving the illusion of original equipment safety.

Strengthening material removed and not replaced

  • The side windows on conversion vans are enlarged to give a more panoramic view. This modification requires the removal of  a section of a strengthening rib (that runs at about waist height along the length of the vehicle) but then nothing is added to return the lost structural strength
  • These vehicles often have fiberglass high-top roofs added. These are bonded to the cant rail once the original roof is removed. When removing the original roof the reinforcement bows, which run from side to side, are removed, without anything being added to replace them.

roof

Additional fittings

  • The seat fittings in conversion vans are often modified to allow them to be easily removed or swivel. These modifications appear to be substandard and would not meet New Zealand LVV requirements.

seats

  • Seatbelt mounting points are often moved and may be substandard (and would not meet NZ LVV requirements).

Page added 1 December 2016 (see amendment details)

43 Takata airbag recall

From 1 November 2018 takata non-alpha air bags subject to a recall will be flagged at the border. As with the alpha airbags, if vehicles do show ‘Open Airbag Recall’, then these vehicles are to be rejected for entry certification until such time as irrefutable evidence is provided from the manufacturer showing that the affected airbags have been replaced.

The recently announced compulsory ‘Takata alpha airbag inflator recall order 2018’ becomes effective from 31 May 2018. From the effective date Takata alpha airbag inflators become a prohibited import as well as being prohibited for sale in trade.

The purpose of this technical bulletin is to outline the entry inspection process to identify vehicles subject to the mandatory Takata Alpha type airbag recall and how to deal with them.

Process

From 31 May 2018 entry certifiers will be required to check if vehicles they are inspecting are damage flagged with notes recorded stating ‘Open Airbag Recall’. Vehicles that are flagged only for ‘Open Airbag Recall’ and have no other damage recorded do not require repair certification.

If they do show ‘Open Airbag Recall’, then these vehicles are to be rejected for entry certification until such time as irrefutable evidence is provided from the manufacturer showing that the affected airbags have been replaced. If that evidence is provided, then the entry certifier can begin the rest of the entry certification compliance process as per usual procedures.

Note. Some vehicles may turn up for entry certification before 31 May 2018 that have already been damage flagged for ‘Open Airbag Recall’ by a Border Inspection Organisation. These vehicles can have the damage flag removed providing the airbag was the only fault, however the customers must be advised that unless the recall is remedied the vehicle cannot be offered for sale in trade after 31 May 2018.

For vehicles border checked prior to 21 May 2018 these notes will not have been added to affected vehicles. A check will have to be made to determine whether or not the vehicle is fitted with an effected airbag. This check can be done using the following websites:

If vehicles are listed on these websites, and no conclusive evidence from the manufacturer is available to show the recall has been conducted, then a damage flag and notes must be recorded stating ‘Open Airbag Recall’.

For vehicles imported from countries other than those listed above, it is up to the importer to show that they are not subject to the recall by providing evidence from the governing authority of the country in question, or alternatively from the manufacturer's New Zealand representative.

Vehicle makes to check

Other than for left-hand drive vehicles, you only need to check vehicles from the following manufacturers (as listed on the rightcar website):

  • BMW
  • Daihatsu
  • Honda
  • Isuzu
  • Lexus
  • Mazda
  • Mitsubishi
  • Nissan
  • Subaru
  • Toyota.

Vehicles from other manufacturers will not have Takata Alpha type airbags fitted, or be Japanese vehicles of concern, so are not subject to the recall.

For left-hand drive vehicles it is up to the importer to supply conclusive evidence that there is no recall for the vehicle and/or that the airbag has been replaced.

Conclusive evidence

Conclusive evidence means documentation stating the Takata Alpha airbag recall has been rectified for the vehicle in question - from any source approved by the Transport Agency, including:

  • the manufacturer
  • the local manufacturer's agent (offical brand importer)
  • Shaken test documentation (see below).
Recall completion certificate

A Japanese Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) process document like the image below can be used to provide evidence of a Shaken test (Japanese WoF). A vehicle can only pass a Shaken test if it has had its Takata Aplha airbags replaced.

If a completed recall certificate for the vehicle in question is presented with a dealers stamp on it, it can be accepted as evidence that the vehicle in question can pass a Shaken test and therefore has had its airbags replaced. It can be accepted as proof that a vehicle has been rectified at a dealership level but might not yet have come off their website.

MLIT evidence

Example of recall completion certificate (without dealer stamp).

Reporting

Please note the Transport Agency require each KSDP to report weekly, the number and the details of vehicles presented that week with damage flag notes stating ‘Open Airbag Recall’ noting which had been rectified (and went through certification) and which were sent away.  These reports can be sent to vehicles@nzta.govt.nz.

Process Summary

For vehicle arriving at entry certification on or after 31 May 2018 the following table applies.

Vehicles border checked before 21 May 2018

Vehicles border checked on or after 21 May 2018

Check the websites listed above for the vehicle make, model and year

  • If the vehicle is listed and no conclusive evidence from the manufacturer is   available to show the recall has been remedied, then damage flag the vehicle   and add notes stating ‘Open Airbag Recall’. Do not entry certify the   vehicle.
  • If   the vehicle is listed, but conclusive evidence from the manufacturer is   available to show the recall has been remedied, then the entry certifier can   begin the entry certification compliance process as per usual procedures
  • If the vehicle is not listed, then the entry certifier can begin the entry   certification compliance process as per usual procedures

If the vehicle is damage flagged check vehicle notes for ‘Open airbag recall’

  • If the vehicle has a damage flag and notes stating ‘Open airbag recall’ and no   conclusive evidence from the manufacturer to show the recall has been remedied.   Do not entry certify the vehicle.
  • If   the vehicle has a damage flag and notes stating ‘Open airbag recall’ and there is conclusive evidence from the manufacturer is available to show the   recall has been remedied, then the entry certifier can begin the entry   certification compliance process as per usual procedures

For vehicle arriving at entry certification before 31 May 2018 that have already been damage flagged for ‘Open Airbag Recall’ by a Border Inspection Organisation. These vehicles can have the damage flag removed providing the airbag was the only fault. However, the customers must be advised that unless the recall is remedied the vehicle cannot be offered for sale in trade on or after 31 May 2018.

Page updated 16 October 2018 (see details)

Page added 23 May 2018 ( updates: 31 May 2018, 8 June 2018)

44 Rust prevention or under-sealing on late model cars from the UK

Vehicle inpection requirements manuals reference
Background

In the UK, roads are salted during the winter to reduce freezing. This causes vehicles to prematurely rust. Because of this, some new vehicle dealers will apply an extra coat of under-sealing prior to sale of a vehicle to protect the vehicle from corrosion.

Application

You do not have to refer to a specialist repair certifier a vehicle that has under-seal applied so long as:

  • the vehicle has been imported from the UK, and
  • the vehicle is less than 1 year old, and
  • the vehicle has travelled less than 2000 km, and
  • there is absolutely no sign of damage (if there is any doubt you must refer the vehicle to a specialist repair certifier), and
  • you add notes to LANDATA explaining that under-seal has been observed and after close investigation no sign of damage repair could be seen.

Page added 1 June 2018 (see amendment details)

45 Recording the number of seats in a vehicle with wheelchair positions

Background

Some vehicles have dedicated wheelchair positions and multi-use positions where an occupant can sit if a wheelchair isn’t present. This technical bulletin provides clarity over how to record the number of seats.

Determining a vehicle’s class

Because wheelchair positions are included in the total seat count, they have an impact when determining a vehicle’s class.

Note: Vehicles of class MA, MB and MC do not have an upper GVM limit so a 9-seat van with a GVM of 4,000kg could be class MB.

Dedicated wheelchair positions

A dedicated wheelchair position is a seating position for transporting a wheelchair and its occupant that is unavailable for other passengers when it is not occupied by a wheelchair.

All dedicated wheelchair positions are included in the total seat count.

Figure 45-1-1. 10 seat omnibus

  • This vehicle has 1 dedicated wheelchair position.
  • The total number of seats should be recorded as 10.
  • It’s classed as an omnibus.
Figure 45-1-2. 10 seat omnibus

  • This vehicle has 2 dedicated wheelchair positions.
  • The total number of seats should be recorded as 10.
  • It’s classed as an omnibus.
Multi-use wheelchair positions

A seating position that can be used for either a wheelchair or seat, but not both simultaneously, is only to be counted as one seat.

If a wheelchair position takes up more than one multi-use seating position, the number of seating positions is the highest possible count of seated passengers.

Figure 45-1-3. 11 seat omnibus

  • This vehicle has a multi-use wheelchair position.
  • There could be 9 occupants in seats and 1 occupant in the wheelchair.
  • If the wheelchair position isn’t used, there could be 11 occupants.
  • The number of seats should be recorded as 11.
  • It’s classed as an omnibus.
Figure 45-1-4. 9 seat class MB vehicle

  • This vehicle has a multi-use wheelchair position.
  • There could be 8 occupants in seats and 1 occupant in the wheelchair.
  • If the wheelchair position isn’t used, there could be 9 occupants.
  • The number of seats should be recorded as 9.
  • Its class is MB.

Page added 1 June 2019 (see amendment details).